Nice parade & protests: China celebrates 69th National Day
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Nice parade & protests: China celebrates 69th National Day

BEIJING on Monday celebrated the 69th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China with pomp and pageantry, while across the border in Hong Kong, protests challenging the shrinking political arena took centre stage.

A day before the official celebration and flag-raising, President Xi Jinping paid tribute to national heroes at the Monument to the People’s Heroes in Tiananmen Square in the capital.

Xi, China’s most powerful leader since the nation’s founder, inspected members of the two million-strong People’s Liberation Army (PLA).

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Chinese President Xi Jinping (C) arrives at Tiananmen Square for a tribute ceremony in front of the Monument to the People’s Heroes, ahead of National Day marking the 69th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing, China, September 30, 2018. Source: Reuters/Jason Lee

During his visit, he stressed the importance of military strength and war preparedness, highlighting the efforts being made to improve the PLA’s capability to win wars, state-run Xinhua news agency reported.

SEE ALSO: Is China becoming the next big colonial power?

On Monday, the guard of honour from the PLA escorted China’s national flag to the flag tower in Tiananmen Square; the same place Chairman Mao Zedong declared the establishment of the People’s Republic on the same day in 1949.  The military band played the national anthem.

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People gather around Monument to the People’s Heroes in Tiananmen Square during National Day in Beijing on October 1, 2018. Source: Fred Dufour/AFP

More than 140,000 people gathered in the square to mark the special occasion. It’s reported some visitors were camped out as early as 8pm the night before to ensure themselves the best spot for photographs.

Spectators were also treated to the giant ornamental flower displays that dotted the city, soaring over 20m above their heads.

Across the country, locals marked the day with their own unique takes on the celebration.

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People attend a tribute ceremony in front of the Monument to the People’s Heroes at Tiananmen Square, ahead of National Day marking the 69th anniversary of the founding of the People’s Republic of China in Beijing, China, September 30, 2018. Source: Reuters/Jason Lee

Farmers in Linying country, in central Henan province, made a huge national flag out of chilli peppers, corn, and soybean to show their patriotism.

Corns and dates were more the style of one couple in East China’s Shandong province, who also crafted the flag to show their support.

SEE ALSO: Convenience & controversy: Hong Kong-China high-speed rail link opens

Monday marked the beginning of a week-long holiday for the Chinese, known as ‘Golden Week.’

The country shuts down for the national break, prompting the second biggest human mass migration in the country as holidaymakers hit the road.

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A man poses for pictures in front of a giant Chinese flag decorated with red chili peppers on the side of a building, ahead of the Chinese National Day at a village in Mengjin county, Henan province, China September 21, 2018. Source: Reuters/Stringer

On Monday alone, about 122 million people travelled domestically on the first day of the holiday.

According to the Ministry of Culture and Tourism, that’s a 7.5 percent rise from last year.

Xinhua reports, domestic tourism revenue generated on Monday reached 103 billion yuan (US$15 billion), up 7.2 percent from 2017.

While Beijing celebrated, very different scenes were unfolding across the border in Hong Kong.

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People pose for a picture as they visit Tiananmen Square during National Day in Beijing on October 1, 2018. Source: Fred Dufour/AFP

Thousands of protestors took to the streets to voice concern on a whole range of issues, from social welfare to democratic rights.

Anti-mainland government protestors have become a fixture of the national day for the last few years.

SEE ALSO: ‘We won’t give up’: Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement keeps fighting on

A major bone of contention for protestors was the government’s decision to ban the pro-independence Hong Kong National Party, citing national security concerns. For many, this highlighted the creeping influence of Beijing in Hong Kong affairs and the shrinking arena for free speech and political dissent.

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Pro-Hong Kong independence protesters shout during a demonstration on China’s National Day in Hong Kong, China October 1, 2018. Source: Reuters/Bobby Yip

Hong Kong was handed back to China by the British in 1997. Under the terms of the handover, semi-autonomous Hong Kong is meant to enjoy freedoms unseen on the mainland, including freedom of expression, association, and elections.

Chanting “Hong Kong is not China”, pro-democracy protesters called for Hong Kong’s independence as they marched on government headquarters.

Despite the unrest, Hong Kong marked the occasion with a spectacular 23-minute fireworks display over Victoria Harbour.

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Fireworks explode over Victoria Harbour as part of China’s National Day celebrations in Hong Kong on October 1, 2018. China, together with Hong Kong and Macau, was celebrating its 69th anniversary with a variety of government-organised festivities. Source: Anthony Wallace/AFP