South Korea: Wartime ‘comfort women’ to get museum in their honour
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South Korea: Wartime ‘comfort women’ to get museum in their honour

SOUTH KOREA plans to build a museum in Seoul to pay tribute to the women forced into sexual slavery by the Japanese army during World War II, a move that could strain ties between the two neighbouring countries.

According to the AFP (via Japan Times), a government minister who made the announcement did not elaborate on when it will be open or the kind of materials will be on display.

Historians believe some 200,000 women were forced to work in Japanese army brothels across Asia during the conflict in 1939-1945. Most of the women were from Korea, as well as other parts of the region, including China and the Philippines.

The South Korean government recently released an 18-second clip which it claims shows these “comfort women” forced to work as sex slaves by Japanese troops.

The Washington Post states the footage may be the “only known moving images of ‘comfort women’ in existence.”

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