Malaysia’s conservative Muslim states were most excited when a former porn star visited KL
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Malaysia’s conservative Muslim states were most excited when a former porn star visited KL

MALAYSIA’s social media pages lit up last weekend when news broke that former porn actress Maria Ozawa was in Kuala Lumpur for a visit.

Apart from becoming the trending topic on Twitter, Malaysians fired up searches on Google to dig up details on the ex-adult star. The most excitement, it seems, came from Kelantan and Terengganu, which are said to be the country’s most conservative Muslim states.

According to data from Google Trends, searches for Ozawa spiked suddenly Sunday when the former actress herself posted photographs of her KL trip on Instagram.

Kelantan topped the list with the most number of searches for the Canadian-Japanese actress, followed by Terengganu, Labuan, Perlis and Pahang.

Kelantan is ruled by the Islamist Pan-Malaysian Islamic Party (PAS), an opposition party that has been fighting to implement the strict Islamic penal code hudud in the country. The east coast state also has strict rules on attire and gender segregation in public spaces.

Oil-rich Terengganu, meanwhile, used to be ruled by PAS and is another state seen as deeply religious and socially conservative.

Those living in the country’s more industrialised cities in the states of Selangor, Penang and Putrajaya, however, were less interested in Ozawa’s visit, data showed.

SEE ALSO: How do Malaysians know who Maria Ozawa is?

Among others, curious Malaysians searched, “maria ozawa datang Malaysia” (Maria Ozawa comes to Malaysia), “maria ozawa in Malaysia”, “maria ozawa wow”, “maria ozawa in kl” and “jose sarasola”, who is Ozawa’s boyfriend and travel partner to the Malaysian capital

They also searched for Ozawa’s films, from Tokyo Species to Nilalang, Erotibot and Irokoishi.

Ozawa visited Kuala Lumpur with her Filipino actor and chef boyfriend Sarasola on Saturday and left on Wednesday.

Pornography of any kind is strictly prohibited in Muslim-majority Malaysia. Local censors also ban movies, cut scenes and any publication material deemed as sensitive to local cultures and religions, and in some situations, information seen by the government as potentially harmful to national security.