UDD Becoming More Middle-Class
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UDD Becoming More Middle-Class

Asia Sentinel:

But support for the UDD is not a black and white issue. Political analysts concur that the formally rural alliance is becoming a freer, more autonomous pro-democracy movement, and is drawing in support from people opposed to Thaksin.
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“The group that started gathering in 2006 after the coup d’etat was very closely associated with Thai Rak Thai politicians,” says Giles Ji Ungpakorn, a political activist and contributor to Asia Sentinel who was charged with lèse majesté for allegedly insulting Thailand’s monarchy in his book A Coup for the Rich.
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“Now a lot of red groups are organizing from below. It’s classical civil society organization and the rebirth of the Thai people movement, many of whom feel the traditional pressure groups and NGOs sided with PAD last year,” he says. “The PAD may have dragged the monarchy into politics, but now the majority of Thai people see the monarchy as having backed their movement.”
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Many have joined the UDD over the last couple of months “who are not supporters of Thaksin, but who have been quite saddened by the way the Democrats came to power and therefore see the UDD as a legitimate vehicle of protest,” Baker says. “Most of the support is from upcountry, but there is now more of a Bangkok base for it.”
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Thitinan says his own research shows more middle class and urban Thais are lending support to the UDD, but that there will not be a mass defection from the PAD’s support base to the reds anytime soon. “People’s interests are too polarised,” he says.
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BP: As blogged the other day, probably only around 35% of people who are there are not traditional Thaksin supporters although this is likely to increase over time although they may still vote for Puea Thai as they consider it to be the lesser of two evils. Otherwise, who else would they vote for?