Food elitism @ Citysuper
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Food elitism @ Citysuper

citysuper  I find the video produced by CNN quite funny and at the same time portrays a little discrimination towards products that come from China.
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/>The video shows an interview with a Hong Kong local who prefers to buy meat and other produce at city’super, a supermarket that sells predominantly imported goods: meat from Japan and United States, cheese from Holland or France, fish from Scandinavia or canned goods from Italy. It’s more expensive to buy grocery items at city’super not only because of the items they sell require more expensive travel allowance but also because their shops are located at prime venues such as ifc and Times Square (not Time Square).
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/>Meanwhile, the more accessible and presumably cheaper merchandise sold at Wellcome and ParkNShop are perceived to come from China and are bypassed by the more health conscious and affluent consumers of this city. Let alone the public markets that possess unpleasant odors to the untrained noses. I have a domestic helper friend whose employers warned her from buying meat and poultry at government installed public markets because her wards could contract germs from these “unsanitary” places.
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/>The consciousness of Hong Kong people towards health didn’t start from those the plague of SARS and bird flu. Everyone is aware the fact that diseases can come in different shapes, sizes and knows no border.
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/>I think it’s not more about where we buy our food (Jusco, ParkNShop or city’super), it’s the way we handle them. As the manager of Wellcome in the video explains how they handle food products, we must also ensure even more that the food we cook deserve to be eaten by practicing good hygiene: clean food thoroughly and maintain clean surroundings.
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/>Of course it isn’t bad to buy items at city’super. Product quality scares from China has definitely brought added dimension in Hong Kong people’s relentless pursuit of maintaining food safety.
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/>Meanwhile, as the price of pork on the mainland has gone up, and so have the prices of eggs, rice, poultry and vegetables. But now, perhaps the biggest bombshell has been dropped – at least to students and workers without time for a proper meal – the price of cheap instant noodles will rise by up to 40 per cent.
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/>D’oh! as I would borrow Homer Simpson’s annoyed grunt, this is just too much.
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/>After absorbing losses for nearly a year, the mainland’s instant noodle industry had finally relented to the upward spiral in the price of raw materials and decided to simultaneously raise prices, the Beijing Times reported.
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/>Data provided by the China chapter of the International Ramen Manufacturers’ Association shows cost of ingredients, ranging from olive oil to wheat flour and chilli, has risen by 19.5 per cent this year, and all instant noodle manufacturers are operating at a loss.
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/>Should there be a change in food lifestyle because of this? Perhaps change the menu to pak choi and choi sum (local veggies eaten after a quick steam or blanch)?
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/>Premium noodles cost about 20 fen more following a price rise last month, but those selling for up to 1 yuan – a sector that accounts for about 60 per cent of the mainland market – will sell for an average 20 per cent more from tomorrow, with some increasing by up to 40 per cent.
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/>While the price rise amounts to only a small sum, it has attracted widespread media attention, amid concerns about inflation due to rising food prices in recent months and the impact on the poor.
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/>Authorities had said that overall food prices surged 11.3 per cent year on year last month, thanks largely to a near 60 per cent increase in the price of pork and more than 30 per cent growth in the cost of other staples.
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/>I don’t think this is surprising. China is experiencing unprecedented economic development. Inflation sometimes goes with it.