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This photo taken off the TV screen shows the blue screen with military crests that replaced all TV programming in Thailand last month. Pic: AP.

Thailand’s junta sets up media watchdogs to monitor anti-coup dissent

By Thu, Jun 26, 2014 11:00AM UTC Comments Off This photo taken off the TV screen shows the blue screen with military crests that replaced all TV programming in Thailand last month. Pic: AP.

Thailand's military junta has set up watchdogs to monitor all kinds of media for content that is deemed as "inciting hatred towards the monarchy" or providing "misinformation" that could potentially complicate the work of the National Council for Peace and Order (NCPO), as the junta calls itself....

Thailand may attempt to extradite UK citizen for insulting monarchy

By Fri, Jun 20, 2014 5:01PM UTC Comments Off Rose. Pic: AP.

Thailand's Ministry of Foreign Affairs has moved to bring a Thai woman back from England on lese majeste charges. According to MCOT, the Ministry of Foreign Affairs reached out to other agencies, including the Royal Thai Police, to bring Chatwadee "Rose" Amornpat to trial under the country's lese majeste law....

Thai red shirt activist shot dead in Bangkok

By Wed, Apr 23, 2014 6:26PM UTC Comments Off Pic: AP.

BANGKOK (AP) — Police in Thailand’s capital say a pro-government activist who opposed a law punishing critics of the monarchy has been shot dead. Police Col. Thanawat Watthanakul says Kamol Duangphasuk was shot by unidentified gunmen Wednesday in a restaurant parking lot in northern Bangkok. The victim, a poet also known as Mainueng Kor Khuntee,...

UPDATED: Lèse majesté vigilantism and Thailand’s political crisis

By Wed, Apr 23, 2014 11:00AM UTC Comments Off UPDATED: Lèse majesté vigilantism and Thailand’s political crisis

As Thailand's political crisis lingers on, the country's draconian lèse majesté law is still being applied, as two related cases show. Moreover, a new online vigilante group is making sure it stays that way....

Siam Voices 2013 review – Part 2: Lèse majesté and the media in the crossfire

By Sat, Dec 28, 2013 12:00PM UTC Comments Off Somyot Pruksakasemsuk arrives in court in Bangkok Wednesday. Pic: AP.

Welcome to the second part of our Siam Voices 2013 year in review series. Today we highlight the state of freedom of speech, which is still endangered by the draconian lèse majesté law. We also take a look at the ongoing protests, where Thailand’s media itself became the story. As the current chaotic protests are dominating...

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