Asian Correspondent » Monash University http://asiancorrespondent.com Asian Correspondent Tue, 26 May 2015 23:48:41 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 Online shopping: the human factor http://asiancorrespondent.com/109439/online-shopping-the-human-factor/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109439/online-shopping-the-human-factor/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:59 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109439/online-shopping-the-human-factor/

Studies of online auctions show how human behaviour affects an item’s eventual sale price. In the past, says Dr Yongfu He, a lecturer in marketing in the Monash University Faculty of Business and Economics, economic and mathematical models were used to predict consumer behaviour. But such models oversimplify the motivations for human behaviour and assume bidders are coolly driven by price alone. “In reality, if people get carried away in the competitive bidding process, they don’t really care if it’s a few dollars more,” Dr He says. Her research in the Monash Behavioural Research Laboratory shows that two influential elements of online auctions are a reference price, such as a “Buy It Now” price, and jump bidding, the strategy of bidding in dramatic increments to shock competitors out of contention.

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Online shopping: the human factor

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Wake-up call http://asiancorrespondent.com/109444/wake-up-call/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109444/wake-up-call/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:47 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109444/wake-up-call/

Insufficient sleep, whatever its cause, impairs human alertness. Reduced alertness creates a social problem that has now been recognised by the Australian Government with the establishment of a Cooperative Research Centre for Alertness, Safety and Productivity. The unprecedented collaboration between industry, government and university sectors will build on Australia’s strengths in sleep and alertness research by bringing together expert knowledge and state-of-the-art technology.Monash University is a key partner, and Professor Shantha Wilson Rajaratnam from the School of Psychology and Psychiatry will lead the research program at Monash. National and international experts will be drawn from disciplines including molecular biology, biophysical modelling, cognitive neuroscience, engineering, occupational health and transport safety.The centre will develop and deploy techniques for shift scheduling and workplace design, alertness assessment devices, programs for better sleep health, and strategies to reduce fatigue.

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Wake-up call

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World watch on biodiversity http://asiancorrespondent.com/109447/world-watch-on-biodiversity/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109447/world-watch-on-biodiversity/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:37 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109447/world-watch-on-biodiversity/

Biodiversity loss diminishes ecosystems and the services they provide to humanity. Yet – in contrast to climate change, which is monitored by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change – no coordinated global system exists to measure and report on biodiversity change or loss. An international team of 30 researchers, led by Henrique Miguel Pereira from the Centre for Environmental Biology at the University of Lisbon, intends to change this.

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World watch on biodiversity

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One-child policy raises multiple issues http://asiancorrespondent.com/109452/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109452/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:26 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109452/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/

The one-child policy that China introduced in 1979 has prevented an estimated 400 million births. But its effects go beyond population control. Recent Monash University research shows that individuals who are only children as a result of the policy are less trusting (and less trustworthy), more risk-averse, less competitive, more pessimistic and less conscientious than similar individuals born just before the policy.Using a series of economic games to test responses, and working collaboratively with researchers from other institutions, Professor Lisa Cameron and Professor Lata Gangadharan from Monash assessed behavioural indicators such as trust and risk-taking in more than 400 subjects in China. They found that even a great deal of contact with social peers was not enough to offset the effects of being an only child.

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One-child policy raises multiple issues

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One-child policy raises multiple issues http://asiancorrespondent.com/109451/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109451/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:26 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109451/one-child-policy-raises-multiple-issues/

The one-child policy that China introduced in 1979 has prevented an estimated 400 million births. But its effects go beyond population control. Recent Monash University research shows that individuals who are only children as a result of the policy are less trusting (and less trustworthy), more risk-averse, less competitive, more pessimistic and less conscientious than similar individuals born just before the policy.Using a series of economic games to test responses, and working collaboratively with researchers from other institutions, Professor Lisa Cameron and Professor Lata Gangadharan from Monash assessed behavioural indicators such as trust and risk-taking in more than 400 subjects in China.

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One-child policy raises multiple issues

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Soaking it up http://asiancorrespondent.com/109455/soaking-it-up/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109455/soaking-it-up/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:15 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109455/soaking-it-up/

A material that has an exceptional capacity to store gas – and needs only light to release it – could transform carbon-capture technology and dramatically reduce emissions from coal power stations.Monash University and Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO) scientists have created a powerful and cost-effective new tool that as well as capturing and storing carbon dioxide can also release it. The researchers use a metal organic framework, a new class of material that has a very large internal surface area. This means it can store a huge quantity of gas. The researchers have discovered a metal organic framework that is also photosensitive. Because it needs only light similar to concentrated sunlight to release the stored carbon, it avoids the expense and inefficiency associated with current methods of carbon capture.

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Soaking it up

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3-D printing extends hand to science http://asiancorrespondent.com/109459/3-d-printing-extends-hand-to-science/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109459/3-d-printing-extends-hand-to-science/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:09:04 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109459/3-d-printing-extends-hand-to-science/

The potential for 3-D printer technology to make lifelike organs for anatomy studies has been demonstrated with the creation of a polymer hand, complete with coloured tendons, muscles, arteries, nerves, skin and bone.Professor Paul McMenamin, director of the Centre for Human Anatomy Education at the Monash University School of Biomedical Sciences, created the 3-D hand with help from colleague Dr Colin McHenry and Michelle Quayle, a research assistant in Dr McHenry’s laboratory. They used CT scans from a dissected cadaver to give a 3-D printer the data it needed to build the model in successive layers of polymer powder, precisely fused into position by a laser. Bones have previously been printed in 3-D, but the team took the idea considerably further by including all the elements, from tendons to tissue.Such models cannot entirely replace real specimens, but they go a long way towards counteracting the difficulties involved in using cadavers. They are likely to be especially welcome in hospitals and universities in remote areas or developing countries. And if a hand can be produced, so can other parts.

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3-D printing extends hand to science

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More snout, less clout http://asiancorrespondent.com/109464/more-snout-less-clout/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109464/more-snout-less-clout/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:51 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109464/more-snout-less-clout/

The longer the snout on a crocodile, the less likely it is to be to tucking into a large lunch. Although long-nosed crocodiles, such as Australia’s freshwater crocodiles, are well known to favour fish or small prey, leaving bigger victims to short-snouted cousins such as the menacing saltwater crocodile, it has not been clear why. Researchers at Monash University’s School of Biomedical Sciences used computer technology to subject the jaws of seven crocodile species to the biting, shaking and twisting loads involved in consuming large prey. The researchers, led by Dr Colin McHenry and PhD student Chris Walmsley, generated 3-D images that showed the lower jaws of short-snouted crocodiles were less likely to break under large loads than long, narrow jaws.Dr McHenry said a jaw’s strength could accurately be predicted by measuring the length of the region where the two halves of the jaw join, called the mandibular symphysis. In killer whales, alligators and saltwater crocodiles – all keen on large prey – the symphysis is a small proportion of the jaw length

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More snout, less clout

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More snout, less clout http://asiancorrespondent.com/109463/more-snout-less-clout/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109463/more-snout-less-clout/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:51 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109463/more-snout-less-clout/

The longer the snout on a crocodile, the less likely it is to be to tucking into a large lunch. Although long-nosed crocodiles, such as Australia’s freshwater crocodiles, are well known to favour fish or small prey, leaving bigger victims to short-snouted cousins such as the menacing saltwater crocodile, it has not been clear why. Researchers at Monash University’s School of Biomedical Sciences used computer technology to subject the jaws of seven crocodile species to the biting, shaking and twisting loads involved in consuming large prey. The researchers, led by Dr Colin McHenry and PhD student Chris Walmsley, generated 3-D images that showed the lower jaws of short-snouted crocodiles were less likely to break under large loads than long, narrow jaws.Dr McHenry said a jaw’s strength could accurately be predicted by measuring the length of the region where the two halves of the jaw join, called the mandibular symphysis. In killer whales, alligators and saltwater crocodiles – all keen on large prey – the symphysis is a small proportion of the jaw length

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More snout, less clout

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Leading the way, sustainably http://asiancorrespondent.com/109468/leading-the-way-sustainably/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109468/leading-the-way-sustainably/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:40 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109468/leading-the-way-sustainably/

Monash University has confirmed its position as a sustainability global leader, with the United Nations appointing Monash to head a Sustainable Development Solutions Network hub in Australia and the Asian region. It is only the second university to take up such a position. With the aim of ending extreme poverty, increasing social inclusion and sustaining the planet, the role involves mobilising research centres, industry and community organisations to develop practical approaches. The Monash program is supported in Australia by the Harold Mitchell Foundation, the National Australia Bank and the Australian Government.

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Leading the way, sustainably

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Leading the way, sustainably http://asiancorrespondent.com/109467/leading-the-way-sustainably/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109467/leading-the-way-sustainably/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:40 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109467/leading-the-way-sustainably/

Monash University has confirmed its position as a sustainability global leader, with the United Nations appointing Monash to head a Sustainable Development Solutions Network hub in Australia and the Asian region. It is only the second university to take up such a position. With the aim of ending extreme poverty, increasing social inclusion and sustaining the planet, the role involves mobilising research centres, industry and community organisations to develop practical approaches. The Monash program is supported in Australia by the Harold Mitchell Foundation, the National Australia Bank and the Australian Government. Monash Vice-Chancellor and President Professor Ed Byrne says the appointment is a tribute to the work done at the Monash Sustainability Institute.TAGS

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Leading the way, sustainably

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A century of memories http://asiancorrespondent.com/109471/a-century-of-memories/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109471/a-century-of-memories/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:02 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109471/a-century-of-memories/

History-changing wartime events, from the Battle of Gettysburg to the D-Day landings and the Fall of Saigon, generate memories not only in those on the frontline, but also in the communities from which they came. For Australians, World War I and the Gallipoli campaign in particular are powerful influences on the understanding of our history and our national identity. As the centenary of World War I approaches, Monash University has launched a project designed to capture and preserve memories of those years.Professor Bruce Scates, from Monash University’s National Centre for Australian Studies, is leading the project. It will gather 100 stories – one for each year since the war began in 1914 – from Australian communities large and small

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A century of memories

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A century of memories http://asiancorrespondent.com/109472/a-century-of-memories/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109472/a-century-of-memories/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:08:02 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109472/a-century-of-memories/

History-changing wartime events, from the Battle of Gettysburg to the D-Day landings and the Fall of Saigon, generate memories not only in those on the frontline, but also in the communities from which they came. For Australians, World War I and the Gallipoli campaign in particular are powerful influences on the understanding of our history and our national identity. As the centenary of World War I approaches, Monash University has launched a project designed to capture and preserve memories of those years.Professor Bruce Scates, from Monash University’s National Centre for Australian Studies, is leading the project. It will gather 100 stories – one for each year since the war began in 1914 – from Australian communities large and small.

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A century of memories

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Meeting the future’s great expectations http://asiancorrespondent.com/109476/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109476/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:07:46 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109476/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/

Meeting the future’s great expectations Guest editorial by Dr Megan Clark, Chief Executive, CSIRO Profound challenges confront Australian manufacturing. The high Australian dollar, the strength of the resources boom and the continuing fallout from the global financial crisis have all had an impact, but perhaps most significant is the intense global and regional competition felt as Asia, and China in particular, invests billions of dollars in research and development.In order to compete globally, Australia has no option but to take a collaborative approach. Individually, research institutions and industry are simply not able to meet such huge challenges.

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Meeting the future’s great expectations

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Meeting the future’s great expectations http://asiancorrespondent.com/109475/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109475/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:07:46 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109475/meeting-the-futures-great-expectations/

Meeting the future’s great expectations Guest editorial by Dr Megan Clark, Chief Executive, CSIRO Profound challenges confront Australian manufacturing. The high Australian dollar, the strength of the resources boom and the continuing fallout from the global financial crisis have all had an impact, but perhaps most significant is the intense global and regional competition felt as Asia, and China in particular, invests billions of dollars in research and development.In order to compete globally, Australia has no option but to take a collaborative approach. Individually, research institutions and industry are simply not able to meet such huge challenges. We cannot do this alone. We need to foster more and deeper partnerships

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Meeting the future’s great expectations

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Unnatural selection http://asiancorrespondent.com/109479/unnatural-selection/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109479/unnatural-selection/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:07:33 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109479/unnatural-selection/

Genetic science has presented us with one of the most complex ethical dilemmas of our time: what kinds of people should be born. Discussion hinges largely on a technology known as pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD), which enables doctors to screen a couple’s embryos to ensure the child has not inherited the genetic predisposition for a serious hereditary disorder such as cystic fibrosis and Tay–Sachs disease or traits such as deafness. PGD is a routine part of in-vitro fertilisation (IVF) when one or both parents lives with a genetic disorder or carries its telltale gene, explains bioethicist Associate Professor Robert Sparrow.Most people would consider the ability to screen out embryos with such genes an unqualified good.

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Unnatural selection

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Science refines the breath of life http://asiancorrespondent.com/109484/science-refines-the-breath-of-life/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109484/science-refines-the-breath-of-life/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:07:19 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109484/science-refines-the-breath-of-life/

Helping premature babies survive is a fraught process that can cause harm even as it preserves life. But the finetuning of resuscitation techniques is making a difference.In developed countries, babies born after only 24 weeks’ gestation have a chance of surviving. Although medical advances have reduced some of the risk in their difficult start to life, these infants tend to be confronted by recurring complications – from chronic lung disease to neurocognitive problems and vision impairment.At Monash University, researchers led by developmental physiologist Professor Richard Harding are refining clinical practices to improve the longer-term health prospects of premature babies, especially for those born before 30 weeks.In particular, his research group is refining how respiratory technologies for preterm infants are applied – during resuscitation, and later during the mechanical ventilation necessary to help them to continue breathing. Professor Harding says this concentration on postnatal care follows a recognition by researchers and doctors that science, for the moment, cannot do any more to reduce the number of premature births.

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Science refines the breath of life

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Life-saving aid for the midwife’s kit http://asiancorrespondent.com/109641/life-saving-aid-for-the-midwifes-kit/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109641/life-saving-aid-for-the-midwifes-kit/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:07:07 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109641/life-saving-aid-for-the-midwifes-kit/

A new approach for controlling haemorrhaging during childbirth could save the lives of thousands of mothers in developing countries.Death during childbirth as a consequence of unchecked postpartum haemorrhage is still a frighteningly real risk for many women, even though it can be readily prevented by an injection of the hormone oxytocin. The tragedy is that this life-saving measure, which stems excessive blood loss, is largely confined to developed countries because oxytocin must be kept in cold storage and injected by trained medical staff using sterile syringes. Consequently, most of the 120,000 to 150,000 mothers reported to die each year from bleeding after delivery are in poor, remote communities that lack the necessary facilities and expertise.To improve the outlook for women in these poorer communities, Monash University researchers led by Dr Michelle McIntosh are developing an inhalable formulation of oxytocin.

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Life-saving aid for the midwife’s kit

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Self-mending fish guides spinal injury research http://asiancorrespondent.com/109643/self-mending-fish-guides-spinal-injury-research/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109643/self-mending-fish-guides-spinal-injury-research/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:06:53 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109643/self-mending-fish-guides-spinal-injury-research/

The spinal blueprint of a tiny tropical fish may offer new ways to treat spinal cord injuries.As a young physiotherapist in the 1990s helping people, often her own age, grapple with the reality of spinal cord injury, Yona Goldshmit became increasingly determined to find better treatments for a condition that is currently irreversible. At the time, she was working in the head trauma and spinal injury unit of Israel’s Loewenstein Hospital Rehabilitation Center. Over three years the sobering aftermath of spinal cord injury revealed itself in the medical complications her patients faced – phantom pains in legs that no longer functioned, osteoporosis, infections and ulcers – all leading to a future of repeated readmission to hospital. Most of her patients were young victims of military training or car accidents

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Self-mending fish guides spinal injury research

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Voices from our time http://asiancorrespondent.com/109645/voices-from-our-time/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109645/voices-from-our-time/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:06:41 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109645/voices-from-our-time/

Monash University’s Professor Alistair Thomson envisages instances in the distant future when historians studying our time will immerse themselves in a unique collection of recorded interviews with Australians born between 1930 and 1989. He pictures the intervening years dropping away as each participant tells a life story – about their origins, the people they loved and lost, their faith and the events that changed their world. Professor Thomson leads the Australian Generations Oral History Project, a snapshot of Australian society that will culminate in 300 interviews being archived at the National Library of Australia. The project comprises 50 participants born in each decade from the 1930s to the 1980s. Unlike oral history projects structured around a set subject or questions, it gives interviewees the freedom to weave their own narrative

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Voices from our time

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A home for exiled memories http://asiancorrespondent.com/109647/a-home-for-exiled-memories/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109647/a-home-for-exiled-memories/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:06:27 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109647/a-home-for-exiled-memories/

The story of the Vietnam War has been told exhaustively … or has it? A Melbourne historian points to a large body of personal experience that is missing.They fought for, but eventually lost, their country. The personal cost was immense: dispossession, exile and – almost as traumatic although less obvious – the pain of having seemingly been erased from history.

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A home for exiled memories

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Rhodes to discovery http://asiancorrespondent.com/109649/rhodes-to-discovery/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109649/rhodes-to-discovery/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:06:13 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109649/rhodes-to-discovery/

Eight Monash University graduates have been selected as Rhodes Scholars since 2002. Linda Vergnani looks at the impact the scholarship has had on the careers and lives of five medical doctors, an ecologist, an aerospace engineer cum jazz musician, and a computer and mechatronics expert.Dr Nathan GrillsRhodes Scholar 2002A Rhodes Scholarship transformed Dr Nathan Grills’ ambitions “from wanting to be an excellent general practitioner to treat needy patients to wanting to work in global public health to change the health of entire communities and countries”.“So rather than treating one patient with a tobacco-related illness, I am helping India to bring about some policy changes in tobacco control. This will affect 1.2 billion people in a country where 1.2 million people die from tobacco annually,” he says.At Oxford, Dr Grills gained a Master of Science in Global Health and a PhD in Global Health, researching the role of faith-based health programs responding to HIV in India. He was employed by the World Health Organization to develop guidelines on working with such programs. Dr Grills, now a National Health and Medical Research Council postdoctoral fellow with the Nossal Institute for Global Health at the University of Melbourne, completed his public health physician training in Australia, recently studying for a Doctor of Public Health at Monash University

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Rhodes to discovery

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Perfect match for global learning http://asiancorrespondent.com/109651/perfect-match-for-global-learning/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109651/perfect-match-for-global-learning/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:06:00 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109651/perfect-match-for-global-learning/

With his eyes on the future, Professor Andrew Coats is bringing together two “impatient adolescent universities” from opposite sides of the world to create a new global model for higher education and research.If the deep relationship forged between two rising institutions on different sides of the planet foreshadows the global, technologically connected future of research and education, then Professor Andrew Coats is both midwife and prophet. A joint appointee of Monash University in Australia and the University of Warwick in the UK, he is in charge of laying the foundations for a powerful new type of education alliance. Professor Coats – research cardiologist, former CEO of a major research park in the UK and now Joint Academic Vice-President and director of the Monash Warwick Alliance – alternates between the two universities, spending no longer than a few weeks at a time at each.

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Perfect match for global learning

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Great expectations in a material world http://asiancorrespondent.com/109653/great-expectations-in-a-material-world/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109653/great-expectations-in-a-material-world/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:05:44 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109653/great-expectations-in-a-material-world/

The extraordinary properties of versatile new materials are opening up a new world at the frontier of nanotechnology.Professor Michael Fuhrer grins with the adventure of it all: “What if we dope graphene with extra electrons … create a whole new material to resemble a high-temperature superconductor, but at room temperature?”It is a bold idea. A new superconductor material, made essentially from something as basic as carbon, but transformed into a material that could usher in the next generation of power storage, vehicle propulsion and even magnetic levitation devices.This is Professor Fuhrer’s world, at the frontier of nanotechnology where the increasing ability to work with atoms and electrons is fabricating new materials whose only limit, at least at the beginning, is human imagination.Professor Fuhrer, formerly associate director of the Maryland NanoCenter and director of the Center for Nanophysics and Advanced Materials in the US, is a new materials pioneer. He has just accepted a five-year Australian Laureate Fellowship to undertake research at Monash University in Melbourne, having applied for the fellowship because it would allow him to do “creative, high-risk nanoscience at the forefront of discovery”. His primary interest is in new electrically conductive materials – graphene, molybdenum disulfide and bismuth selenide – that could become a replacement for silicon for more advanced, versatile electronics.Graphene, in particular, exemplifies that this is frontier science. It is a lattice-like layer just one carbon atom thick and was isolated (from graphite) as an actual two-dimensional material in 2004 by Professor Andre Geim and Professor Konstantin Novoselov at the University of Manchester – a feat for which they received the 2010 Nobel Prize in Physics.Professor Fuhrer says graphene would be an effective conductor of electrical current while sitting on the surface of just about any other material: glass, plastic or even a flexible material such as cloth.“This is very different to conventional semiconductor material where you start with a wafer of single crystal silicon and everything is done on top of that wafer

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Great expectations in a material world

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Cool heads may save a lifetime of pain http://asiancorrespondent.com/109655/cool-heads-may-save-a-lifetime-of-pain/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109655/cool-heads-may-save-a-lifetime-of-pain/#comments Mon, 10 Jun 2013 21:05:25 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109655/cool-heads-may-save-a-lifetime-of-pain/

Vast trials of intensive care treatments conducted across multiple hospital sites, often in different countries, are the only way to ensure doctors are giving seriously ill patients the best chance of a normal life.Paramedics at the scene of an accident have become front-line assistants in research that measures whether immediate and prolonged cooling of an accident victim with major head trauma can minimise the risk of lasting brain damage.These paramedics, employed by participating ambulance services in Australia, New Zealand and France, are part of a landmark study that extends intensive care research to the accident scene and will include 500 patients. A common therapy for heart attack patients thought to be at risk of brain damage, cooling has previously been trialled on a smaller scale as a treatment for brain trauma, with the cooling slowing inflammation and potential tissue death. But the director of Monash University’s Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre (ANZIC-RC), which is coordinating the trial, says data from these earlier trials suggests it was often administered inadequately. “By carefully looking at the previous data, we could see that a lot of complications were occurring due to withdrawing the treatment too quickly and too early,” Professor Jamie Cooper explains. “The natural history of a brain injury is very similar to the natural history of a bruise.

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Cool heads may save a lifetime of pain

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