Asian Correspondent » George Mason University http://asiancorrespondent.com Asian Correspondent Wed, 20 May 2015 11:20:38 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=4.1 GMAT Overview http://asiancorrespondent.com/110802/gmat-overview/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/110802/gmat-overview/#comments Thu, 18 Jul 2013 02:07:23 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/110802/gmat-overview/ GMAT Overview

Source: womenonbusiness.com via Women on Business on Pinterest

Preparation is key to your overall success on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). In past blog posts, we’ve discussed where the GMAT started, along with predictions of future changes. Now, for those considering attending business school, here’s a brief overview of the GMAT based on the above infographic.

The GMAT is a 3 & a ½ hour long computer based test. The test contains 4 timed sections including the Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical Writing Assessment, and Integrated Reasoning. As of June 2012, the most recent modification to the GMAT has been the Integrated Reasoning section. This section was added to test the interpretation of graphics, tables, and other data sources.

Achieving the highest score possible on the GMAT all comes down to outlining a well-calculated study plan. Students are encouraged to start studying 3-6 months prior to taking the GMAT. Several websites provide study tips or offer services to assist with plan creation. Before sitting down to compose your study plan, start by familiarizing yourself with the test’s structure and principles.

As previously mentioned, preparation is key to your GMAT success. Utilize all available resources, such as online forums and local study groups, to obtain the highest possible score. Good luck!

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GMAT Overview

Source: womenonbusiness.com via Women on Business on Pinterest

Preparation is key to your overall success on the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). In past blog posts, we’ve discussed where the GMAT started, along with predictions of future changes. Now, for those considering attending business school, here’s a brief overview of the GMAT based on the above infographic.

The GMAT is a 3 & a ½ hour long computer based test. The test contains 4 timed sections including the Verbal, Quantitative, Analytical Writing Assessment, and Integrated Reasoning. As of June 2012, the most recent modification to the GMAT has been the Integrated Reasoning section. This section was added to test the interpretation of graphics, tables, and other data sources.

Achieving the highest score possible on the GMAT all comes down to outlining a well-calculated study plan. Students are encouraged to start studying 3-6 months prior to taking the GMAT. Several websites provide study tips or offer services to assist with plan creation. Before sitting down to compose your study plan, start by familiarizing yourself with the test’s structure and principles.

As previously mentioned, preparation is key to your GMAT success. Utilize all available resources, such as online forums and local study groups, to obtain the highest possible score. Good luck!

, , , , , , , , , ,

Continue reading:  

GMAT Overview

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What you will learn in the Mason MBA Program http://asiancorrespondent.com/110735/what-you-will-learn-in-the-mason-mba-program/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/110735/what-you-will-learn-in-the-mason-mba-program/#comments Tue, 16 Jul 2013 03:14:17 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/110735/what-you-will-learn-in-the-mason-mba-program/ What you will learn in the Mason MBA Program

You may be thinking about getting an MBA. You may have already sent in applications. As you research MBA programs, you’ll likely start with program websites, but where do you do from there? How do you get a sense of what you will learn and if the MBA program fits your career goals?

The best way to find out if an MBA program is the right fit for you is to hear directly from the faculty who will be teaching you, the students currently in the program, and the alumni who have graduated from the program. MBA program information sessions are a great source to interact with each of these groups.

At George Mason, we make sure that faculty, current students, and alumni are on hand to talk about their experiences in the Mason MBA program and most importantly, to answer your questions. The video below is from our last information session. It’s a good place to get some answers. And a great place to get more questions answered is our next MBA program information session on September 25. Also, feel free to call us anytime at 703-574-0581.

Mason MBA Program Info Session Video

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What you will learn in the Mason MBA Program

You may be thinking about getting an MBA. You may have already sent in applications. As you research MBA programs, you’ll likely start with program websites, but where do you do from there? How do you get a sense of what you will learn and if the MBA program fits your career goals?

The best way to find out if an MBA program is the right fit for you is to hear directly from the faculty who will be teaching you, the students currently in the program, and the alumni who have graduated from the program. MBA program information sessions are a great source to interact with each of these groups.

At George Mason, we make sure that faculty, current students, and alumni are on hand to talk about their experiences in the Mason MBA program and most importantly, to answer your questions. The video below is from our last information session. It’s a good place to get some answers. And a great place to get more questions answered is our next MBA program information session on September 25. Also, feel free to call us anytime at 703-574-0581.

Mason MBA Program Info Session Video

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What you will learn in the Mason MBA Program

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The Changing Face of the MBA http://asiancorrespondent.com/110533/the-changing-face-of-the-mba/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/110533/the-changing-face-of-the-mba/#comments Thu, 11 Jul 2013 06:05:22 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/110533/the-changing-face-of-the-mba/ The Changing Face of the MBA

Source: netimpact.org via Andrew on Pinterest

Aside from the introduction of online courses in 1987, MBA programs have faced few revolutionary changes in recent years. However, the inclusion of social and environmental themes within the curriculum have elicited subtle modifications across numerous MBA programs. The infographic above outlines how some of these changes are influencing not only the MBA programs themselves, but also graduates and their impact on the professional world.

Let’s look at how the aforementioned social and environmental themes have influenced MBA programs. During this survey from Net Impact, 3,000+ participants were asked to select what they considered to be the top strength out of 11 possible options within their chosen MBA program. Students voted Corporate Responsibility as the top strength, with social entrepreneurship and environmental sustainability not far behind. These results indicate MBA students are absorbing positive ethical standards they will later utilize within their career fields.

Another element of the MBA program influenced by these themes is the initial search for employment. 29% of students surveyed admit to feeling pressured into accepting the first job offer they’re presented with, regardless of social and environmental impact. However, 77% of students indicated those within their program prioritize locating jobs possessing these qualities.

All-in-all, a definitive weight is being placed on not only obtaining the skills to flourish on your own, but also assisting in the social, environmental, and ethical growth of your future career field. Luckily MBA programs are continually evolving to help students face these challenges head on.

Are you interested in obtaining a Master of Business Administration degree but uncertain what program is right for you? Allow us at George Mason University to assist you with building a brighter future for yourself and your family.

, , , , , , , ]]>

The Changing Face of the MBA

Source: netimpact.org via Andrew on Pinterest

Aside from the introduction of online courses in 1987, MBA programs have faced few revolutionary changes in recent years. However, the inclusion of social and environmental themes within the curriculum have elicited subtle modifications across numerous MBA programs. The infographic above outlines how some of these changes are influencing not only the MBA programs themselves, but also graduates and their impact on the professional world.

Let’s look at how the aforementioned social and environmental themes have influenced MBA programs. During this survey from Net Impact, 3,000+ participants were asked to select what they considered to be the top strength out of 11 possible options within their chosen MBA program. Students voted Corporate Responsibility as the top strength, with social entrepreneurship and environmental sustainability not far behind. These results indicate MBA students are absorbing positive ethical standards they will later utilize within their career fields.

Another element of the MBA program influenced by these themes is the initial search for employment. 29% of students surveyed admit to feeling pressured into accepting the first job offer they’re presented with, regardless of social and environmental impact. However, 77% of students indicated those within their program prioritize locating jobs possessing these qualities.

All-in-all, a definitive weight is being placed on not only obtaining the skills to flourish on your own, but also assisting in the social, environmental, and ethical growth of your future career field. Luckily MBA programs are continually evolving to help students face these challenges head on.

Are you interested in obtaining a Master of Business Administration degree but uncertain what program is right for you? Allow us at George Mason University to assist you with building a brighter future for yourself and your family.

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The Changing Face of the MBA

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Navigating Your Route to an MBA http://asiancorrespondent.com/110368/navigating-your-route-to-an-mba/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/110368/navigating-your-route-to-an-mba/#comments Sun, 07 Jul 2013 18:03:55 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/110368/navigating-your-route-to-an-mba/ MBA Paths and Their Payoff infographic by benpham.

In previous years, MBA students chose their career paths based solely on financial growth and career advancement. While these attributes will always remain vital when selecting an MBA program, modern day students are taking other circumstances into consideration such as a career field’s overall stress and satisfaction levels. The above infographic outlines four common MBA paths and how the aforementioned job aspects compare. Let’s take a closer look at the distinctions between these programs.

First we’ll focus on the popularity, satisfaction, and stress levels of the MBA program path’s listed above. From the infographic, you can clearly see the programs contain varying percentages in each category. One look at the most popular MBA program, Finance, depicts noticeable differences in the amount of stress and satisfaction percentage levels. Although this MBA program’s popularity is preeminent, both its satisfaction and stress levels come in second to last when compared to the other programs.

On the opposite end of the popularity spectrum, we see the Technology Management MBA path has the lowest ranking level of popularity. However, while the popularity of this MBA degree is noticeably low, it contains the highest reported satisfaction levels and lowest stress levels. However, it should be noted that the margin between the highest/lowest stress and satisfaction percentiles are almost negligible in how close they appear to be.

Let’s look at the infographic from another perspective: Income. Obtaining an MBA degree in Marketing, while reportedly providing the lowest job satisfaction and highest levels of stress, offers the largest wage growth at 108% from starting to mid-career salary.

In conclusion, the above data is substantial to consider when determining your MBA path. Each career field contains its share of pros and cons, however the choice is ultimately yours to make. By weighing your options and past career experience, obtaining an MBA degree could be vital to both your monetary needs and overall job satisfaction.

If you’re interested in pursuing an MBA degree, visit our School of Management page to learn more.

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MBA Paths and Their Payoff infographic by benpham.

In previous years, MBA students chose their career paths based solely on financial growth and career advancement. While these attributes will always remain vital when selecting an MBA program, modern day students are taking other circumstances into consideration such as a career field’s overall stress and satisfaction levels. The above infographic outlines four common MBA paths and how the aforementioned job aspects compare. Let’s take a closer look at the distinctions between these programs.

First we’ll focus on the popularity, satisfaction, and stress levels of the MBA program path’s listed above. From the infographic, you can clearly see the programs contain varying percentages in each category. One look at the most popular MBA program, Finance, depicts noticeable differences in the amount of stress and satisfaction percentage levels. Although this MBA program’s popularity is preeminent, both its satisfaction and stress levels come in second to last when compared to the other programs.

On the opposite end of the popularity spectrum, we see the Technology Management MBA path has the lowest ranking level of popularity. However, while the popularity of this MBA degree is noticeably low, it contains the highest reported satisfaction levels and lowest stress levels. However, it should be noted that the margin between the highest/lowest stress and satisfaction percentiles are almost negligible in how close they appear to be.

Let’s look at the infographic from another perspective: Income. Obtaining an MBA degree in Marketing, while reportedly providing the lowest job satisfaction and highest levels of stress, offers the largest wage growth at 108% from starting to mid-career salary.

In conclusion, the above data is substantial to consider when determining your MBA path. Each career field contains its share of pros and cons, however the choice is ultimately yours to make. By weighing your options and past career experience, obtaining an MBA degree could be vital to both your monetary needs and overall job satisfaction.

If you’re interested in pursuing an MBA degree, visit our School of Management page to learn more.

Visit site:

Navigating Your Route to an MBA

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Key Characteristics of an MBA Student http://asiancorrespondent.com/110151/key-characteristics-of-an-mba-student/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/110151/key-characteristics-of-an-mba-student/#comments Wed, 03 Jul 2013 04:00:36 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/110151/key-characteristics-of-an-mba-student/ Key Characteristics of an MBA Student

Several driving factors lead students to MBA program enrollment: employment opportunity increases, development of skills, a higher salary. While each student’s reasoning for seeking an MBA program is unique, Harvard Business school recently posed the question “Are there certain characteristics successful MBA degree seekers possess?” Upon further investigation, researchers were able to identify certain traits that exist ostensibly in degree holders. Here’s a look at the prominent characteristics possessed by successful MBA grads:

Born Leaders

MBA students demonstrate initiative from the get-go. Leading is their forte, whether managing a project or directing a team. Goals made when entering an MBA program include cultivating and improving upon their already remarkable leadership skills.

Unyielding Focus

While maintaining focus proves difficult for many, MBA students have little to no trouble remaining focused on class assignments and projects. Their adamant fixation on the task at hand provides a mental barrier, unbroken by minor distractions.

Commitment

Gaining acceptance to an accredited MBA program requires drive and commitment. Prior to receiving their degree, students remain absolutely committed to their own career goals and skill advancement.

An Eye for Creativity

In a business environment, certain obstacles requiring critical decision making may arise. Successful MBA students use their logical and analytical skills to think ‘outside of the box’ and deliver an ingenious solution, no matter the level of difficulty.

Concise Communication Skills

Demonstrating accomplished communication skills, especially written communication, is a key component to your success within the business world . MBA students will possess a professional tone, whether written or verbal.

Additional studies have proven successful MBA graduates often go on to become strong networkers due to their adept social skills. No matter your career choice, honing the aforementioned traits and obtaining your degree will surely land you a great job in the near future.

, , , , , , ]]>

Key Characteristics of an MBA Student

Several driving factors lead students to MBA program enrollment: employment opportunity increases, development of skills, a higher salary. While each student’s reasoning for seeking an MBA program is unique, Harvard Business school recently posed the question “Are there certain characteristics successful MBA degree seekers possess?” Upon further investigation, researchers were able to identify certain traits that exist ostensibly in degree holders. Here’s a look at the prominent characteristics possessed by successful MBA grads:

Born Leaders

MBA students demonstrate initiative from the get-go. Leading is their forte, whether managing a project or directing a team. Goals made when entering an MBA program include cultivating and improving upon their already remarkable leadership skills.

Unyielding Focus

While maintaining focus proves difficult for many, MBA students have little to no trouble remaining focused on class assignments and projects. Their adamant fixation on the task at hand provides a mental barrier, unbroken by minor distractions.

Commitment

Gaining acceptance to an accredited MBA program requires drive and commitment. Prior to receiving their degree, students remain absolutely committed to their own career goals and skill advancement.

An Eye for Creativity

In a business environment, certain obstacles requiring critical decision making may arise. Successful MBA students use their logical and analytical skills to think ‘outside of the box’ and deliver an ingenious solution, no matter the level of difficulty.

Concise Communication Skills

Demonstrating accomplished communication skills, especially written communication, is a key component to your success within the business world . MBA students will possess a professional tone, whether written or verbal.

Additional studies have proven successful MBA graduates often go on to become strong networkers due to their adept social skills. No matter your career choice, honing the aforementioned traits and obtaining your degree will surely land you a great job in the near future.

, , , , , ,

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Key Characteristics of an MBA Student

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Career Services Key When Comparing MBA Programs in Virginia http://asiancorrespondent.com/109978/career-services-key-when-comparing-mba-programs-in-virginia/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109978/career-services-key-when-comparing-mba-programs-in-virginia/#comments Thu, 27 Jun 2013 02:26:38 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109978/career-services-key-when-comparing-mba-programs-in-virginia/ Choosing an MBA program is a difficult task—there are a lot of factors to consider. One of the most important factors is something that is often only used at the end of a program: career services. Checking into career services of each of the MBA programs you are considering is very important and can have a major impact on your post-graduation plans.
According to the US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2011, the average American, ages 25-54 (with children) worked 8.8 hours per day. If you consider that most individuals will work 5 days a week for 50 weeks a year (2 weeks of vacation) that will equal about 2,200 hours per year. Now most individuals will work at least about 40 years before retirement (ages 25-65)—that’s a whopping 88,000 hours in a lifetime (not including extra hours, overtime, additional work years, etc.). To say the least, that is a lot of time to spend working.

So what’s the best way to make sure you enjoy your working time rather than dread it? The key is to find something you love and do that, but the trick is that you must also give yourself the tools you need to succeed in your career.

Each of the ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) has a unique industry network and offers a range of career services to help place you in the career you are looking for. The top ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) according to U.S. News & World Report are:

George Mason University School of Management Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech Robins School of Business at University of Richmond Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary Virginia Commonwealth University

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top part-time ranked MBA Programs in Virginia.*

George Mason University School of Management
At George Mason, we are hard at work building doors of opportunity for our students to walk through. George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections in the greater Washington, D.C. region with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, government agencies, government contractors, and technology giants. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of employers such as AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, government leaders, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 66.6%

Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech

The Virginia Tech MBA Career Experience emphasizes a holistic, proactive, integrated marketing approach to the career search. A unique organizational structure offers MBA students synergy between academic and career advising. Rather than shuttling between a career services advisor in one office and an academic advisor in another, these functions have been merged such that students may establish and maintain a relationship with one advisor who is adept in both advising arenas.

Students have the assistance of the MBA Program’s career and job search advising office, in addition to the university’s Career Services office. Through this customizable approach to internship and job searching, they help students identify and capitalize on their distinctive gifts to determine how their career objectives fit their personal and professional priorities. Pamplin College of Business students can also check out the university’s Career Center, which hosts on-campus interviewing and helps with cover letters, negotiating salaries, and networking, among other things.


Salary:
Average base salary: $67,392
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 52.6%

Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Students at the Robins School of Business have access to the MBA Career Management series which consists of a series of workshops that focus on practical tips and techniques for managing your career. Past topics have included: Communications Strategy; Resume Essentials; Know Your Reputation; Effective Networking; Networking with Social Media; Interviewing & Negotiating; and Creating Effective Team Meetings.
Students at Robins join a student body with experience at firms including Altria, Bon Secours, Capital One, Dominion, DuPont, The Federal Reserve Bank, Genworth Financial, Honeywell, Markel, The Martin Agency, MeadWestvaco, and Timmons Group. Upon graduation, students join a loyal alumni network of presidents, vice presidents and leading executives at major corporations and entrepreneurial ventures in Richmond, VA and around the world.

Salary:
Average base salary: n/a
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: n/a


Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary

For post-graduation plans, MBA students can check out CareerPREP, which helps students find employment and, each academic year, provides them with a $300 stipend for job search-related activities. Through CareerPREP, the school partners with students on their schedule, offering a system of resources and tools specifically designed to facilitate the career development process and help students advance in the workplace or to transition into a new field.

Throughout each student’s time in the program and as alumni, they will have access to: one-on-one career coaching, career workshops and events, and a personal branding toolkit. Graduate students earning an accounting degree can explore the Cohen Career Center, which hosts on-campus recruitment events, as well as career workshops.


Salary:
Average base salary: $75,674
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 56.9%

Virginia Commonwealth University

At Virginia Commonwealth, Career Services is dedicated to assisting business students in defining and attaining career goals. By recognizing the need for differentiation in today’s competitive job market and providing tools to help students develop and showcase their skills and experience, Career Services provides a valuable service, for life.  Richmond also offers a prosperous commercial environment for many small businesses and was ranked by Entrepreneur magazine as the No. 1 mid-sized city in the US for small businesses.

Salary:
Average base salary: n/a
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: n/a

**
The great American actor Milton Berle once said, “If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.” One way to build your own door is to pursue your MBA. The new skills you will gain will assist you in your success. And when choosing from MBA programs in Virginia (or anywhere), it is vital that you consider the career services that the program offers. Getting the skills is the first step, but then having the assistance to find the right job to use these skills may even be more important.
Although it is up to you to open your doors, the help of career services will make all the difference upon graduation and throughout your career. Be sure to utilize all services available to you to maximize your success!

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>

Choosing an MBA program is a difficult task—there are a lot of factors to consider. One of the most important factors is something that is often only used at the end of a program: career services. Checking into career services of each of the MBA programs you are considering is very important and can have a major impact on your post-graduation plans.
According to the US Department of Labor’s Bureau of Labor Statistics, in 2011, the average American, ages 25-54 (with children) worked 8.8 hours per day. If you consider that most individuals will work 5 days a week for 50 weeks a year (2 weeks of vacation) that will equal about 2,200 hours per year. Now most individuals will work at least about 40 years before retirement (ages 25-65)—that’s a whopping 88,000 hours in a lifetime (not including extra hours, overtime, additional work years, etc.). To say the least, that is a lot of time to spend working.

So what’s the best way to make sure you enjoy your working time rather than dread it? The key is to find something you love and do that, but the trick is that you must also give yourself the tools you need to succeed in your career.

Each of the ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) has a unique industry network and offers a range of career services to help place you in the career you are looking for. The top ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) according to U.S. News & World Report are:

George Mason University School of Management
Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech
Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary
Virginia Commonwealth University

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top part-time ranked MBA Programs in Virginia.*

George Mason University School of Management
At George Mason, we are hard at work building doors of opportunity for our students to walk through. George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections in the greater Washington, D.C. region with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, government agencies, government contractors, and technology giants. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of employers such as AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, government leaders, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 66.6%

Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech

The Virginia Tech MBA Career Experience emphasizes a holistic, proactive, integrated marketing approach to the career search. A unique organizational structure offers MBA students synergy between academic and career advising. Rather than shuttling between a career services advisor in one office and an academic advisor in another, these functions have been merged such that students may establish and maintain a relationship with one advisor who is adept in both advising arenas.

Students have the assistance of the MBA Program’s career and job search advising office, in addition to the university’s Career Services office. Through this customizable approach to internship and job searching, they help students identify and capitalize on their distinctive gifts to determine how their career objectives fit their personal and professional priorities. Pamplin College of Business students can also check out the university’s Career Center, which hosts on-campus interviewing and helps with cover letters, negotiating salaries, and networking, among other things.


Salary:
Average base salary: $67,392
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 52.6%

Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Students at the Robins School of Business have access to the MBA Career Management series which consists of a series of workshops that focus on practical tips and techniques for managing your career. Past topics have included: Communications Strategy; Resume Essentials; Know Your Reputation; Effective Networking; Networking with Social Media; Interviewing & Negotiating; and Creating Effective Team Meetings.
Students at Robins join a student body with experience at firms including Altria, Bon Secours, Capital One, Dominion, DuPont, The Federal Reserve Bank, Genworth Financial, Honeywell, Markel, The Martin Agency, MeadWestvaco, and Timmons Group. Upon graduation, students join a loyal alumni network of presidents, vice presidents and leading executives at major corporations and entrepreneurial ventures in Richmond, VA and around the world.

Salary:
Average base salary: n/a
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: n/a


Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary

For post-graduation plans, MBA students can check out CareerPREP, which helps students find employment and, each academic year, provides them with a $300 stipend for job search-related activities. Through CareerPREP, the school partners with students on their schedule, offering a system of resources and tools specifically designed to facilitate the career development process and help students advance in the workplace or to transition into a new field.

Throughout each student’s time in the program and as alumni, they will have access to: one-on-one career coaching, career workshops and events, and a personal branding toolkit. Graduate students earning an accounting degree can explore the Cohen Career Center, which hosts on-campus recruitment events, as well as career workshops.


Salary:
Average base salary: $75,674
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: 56.9%

Virginia Commonwealth University

At Virginia Commonwealth, Career Services is dedicated to assisting business students in defining and attaining career goals. By recognizing the need for differentiation in today’s competitive job market and providing tools to help students develop and showcase their skills and experience, Career Services provides a valuable service, for life.  Richmond also offers a prosperous commercial environment for many small businesses and was ranked by Entrepreneur magazine as the No. 1 mid-sized city in the US for small businesses.

Salary:
Average base salary: n/a
Full-time graduate employed at graduation: n/a

**
The great American actor Milton Berle once said, “If opportunity doesn’t knock, build a door.” One way to build your own door is to pursue your MBA. The new skills you will gain will assist you in your success. And when choosing from MBA programs in Virginia (or anywhere), it is vital that you consider the career services that the program offers. Getting the skills is the first step, but then having the assistance to find the right job to use these skills may even be more important.
Although it is up to you to open your doors, the help of career services will make all the difference upon graduation and throughout your career. Be sure to utilize all services available to you to maximize your success!

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Link:  

Career Services Key When Comparing MBA Programs in Virginia

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Comparing ranked MBA programs in Virginia http://asiancorrespondent.com/109808/comparing-ranked-mba-programs-in-virginia/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109808/comparing-ranked-mba-programs-in-virginia/#comments Mon, 24 Jun 2013 19:30:18 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109808/comparing-ranked-mba-programs-in-virginia/ There are numerous part-time ranked MBA programs in Virginia according to U.S. News & World Report. Students who live or work in Virginia can compare programs state-wide when looking for an MBA program that fits their needs. The top five ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) according to U.S. News & World Report are:

George Mason University School of Management Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech Robins School of Business at University of Richmond Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary Virginia Commonwealth University
 

Below is a brief description of each of the top ranked MBA programs in Virginia.
George Mason University School of Management
Ranked #93 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Fairfax, Virginia
Average GMAT: 612; Average GPA: 3.2
Part-time enrollment: 310
Duration: 23 months
Total Tuition Cost: $39,840 (in-state); $59,856 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 48 credits at $830 (in-state) or $1,486 (out-of-state)

Curriculum blends theory and practice providing a solid foundation in broad range of management disciplines. Students connect advanced analytical and conceptual skills to strategic decision-making through the case-study method and small group activities. Students can choose from nine areas of emphasis or create their own specialization and have the opportunity to work alongside faculty as research or teaching assistants. Small class sizes, diverse student body, expert faculty, and a required global residency are staples of the part-time program that can be completed in as few as 23 months. Students have the option of enrolling on the Fairfax or Arlington campuses located a short drive or metro ride from Washington, D.C.

Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech
Ranked #34 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Blacksburg, Virginia
Average GMAT: 627; Average GPA: 3.46
Part-time enrollment: 150

Duration: 36+ months

Total Tuition Cost: $31,536 (in-state); $59,856 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 48 credits at $657 (in-state) or $1,247 (out-of-state)

Students pursuing an MBA from Virginia Tech can do so full-time in Blacksburg, or part-time only in Falls Church. Graduate students in the Pamplin College of Business can also take advantage of the Graduate Life Center on the Blacksburg campus, which has a 24/7 computer lab, café, study room, lounge, and meeting rooms for reservation—all specifically for grad students. Program focuses on entrepreneurial leadership, global business, and technology innovation.

Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Ranked #64 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Richmond, Virginia
Average GMAT: 604; Average GPA: 3.21
Part-time enrollment: 113

Duration: 24 months

Total Tuition Cost: $55,350
Cost/Credit:  45 credits at $1,230

The Richmond MBA aims to enhance the strategic thinking of experienced individuals through rigorous courses that feature applied learning opportunities. The program relies on a close collaboration among the student body, faculty, and local business and community leaders. They combine to create rich and relevant discussions both inside and outside of the classroom. The curriculum consists of required pre-course instruction in accounting and statistics, 12 core courses, an Opening Residency, an International Residency, 4 elective courses, and a Capstone project.

Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary
Ranked #69 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Williamsburg, Virginia
Average GMAT: 593; Average GPA: 3.3
Part-time enrollment: 180
Duration: 36 months
Total Tuition Cost: $37,800 (in-state); $59,400 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 54 credits at $700 (in-state) or $1,100 (out-of-state)
The College of William and Mary is the second-oldest institute of higher education in the country. Through the flex MBA program, students take classes weekday evenings for about three years. The Flex MBA combines leadership, hard work, integrity, and innovation that will be the cornerstones of the new economy.

Virginia Commonwealth University
Ranked #112 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Richmond, Virginia
Average GMAT: 528; Average GPA: 3.37
Part-time enrollment: 180
Duration: 36 months
Total Tuition Cost: $30,153 (in-state); $62,073 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 57 credits at $529 (in-state) or $1,089 (out-of-state)

Located in downtown Richmond, the Virginia Commonwealth University MBA program offers a combination of business theory, practical application, and a valuable network of career contacts. The MBA program has a total of 19 courses. The first seven are foundation courses and cover the core concepts in business discipline. The advanced program is 12 courses broken out into 9 core courses that all students complete and 3 electives which allow students to concentrate in a particular area. Instruction combines lecture with case study, game theory, and group project activities.

Other part-time ranked MBA programs in Virginia include Old Dominion University (#117) in Norfolk, Radford University (#136) in Radford, Shenandoah University (Listed But Rank Not Published) in Winchester. In addition, while Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville has a ranked full-time MBA program, it does not offer a part-time MBA program.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>
There are numerous part-time ranked MBA programs in Virginia according to U.S. News & World Report. Students who live or work in Virginia can compare programs state-wide when looking for an MBA program that fits their needs. The top five ranked MBA programs in Virginia (part-time) according to U.S. News & World Report are:

George Mason University School of Management
Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech
Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary
Virginia Commonwealth University
 

Below is a brief description of each of the top ranked MBA programs in Virginia.
George Mason University School of Management
Ranked #93 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Fairfax, Virginia
Average GMAT: 612; Average GPA: 3.2
Part-time enrollment: 310
Duration: 23 months
Total Tuition Cost: $39,840 (in-state); $59,856 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 48 credits at $830 (in-state) or $1,486 (out-of-state)

Curriculum blends theory and practice providing a solid foundation in broad range of management disciplines. Students connect advanced analytical and conceptual skills to strategic decision-making through the case-study method and small group activities. Students can choose from nine areas of emphasis or create their own specialization and have the opportunity to work alongside faculty as research or teaching assistants. Small class sizes, diverse student body, expert faculty, and a required global residency are staples of the part-time program that can be completed in as few as 23 months. Students have the option of enrolling on the Fairfax or Arlington campuses located a short drive or metro ride from Washington, D.C.

Pamplin College of Business at Virginia Tech
Ranked #34 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Blacksburg, Virginia
Average GMAT: 627; Average GPA: 3.46
Part-time enrollment: 150

Duration: 36+ months

Total Tuition Cost: $31,536 (in-state); $59,856 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 48 credits at $657 (in-state) or $1,247 (out-of-state)

Students pursuing an MBA from Virginia Tech can do so full-time in Blacksburg, or part-time only in Falls Church. Graduate students in the Pamplin College of Business can also take advantage of the Graduate Life Center on the Blacksburg campus, which has a 24/7 computer lab, café, study room, lounge, and meeting rooms for reservation—all specifically for grad students. Program focuses on entrepreneurial leadership, global business, and technology innovation.

Robins School of Business at University of Richmond
Ranked #64 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Richmond, Virginia
Average GMAT: 604; Average GPA: 3.21
Part-time enrollment: 113

Duration: 24 months

Total Tuition Cost: $55,350
Cost/Credit:  45 credits at $1,230

The Richmond MBA aims to enhance the strategic thinking of experienced individuals through rigorous courses that feature applied learning opportunities. The program relies on a close collaboration among the student body, faculty, and local business and community leaders. They combine to create rich and relevant discussions both inside and outside of the classroom. The curriculum consists of required pre-course instruction in accounting and statistics, 12 core courses, an Opening Residency, an International Residency, 4 elective courses, and a Capstone project.

Mason School of Business at College of William & Mary
Ranked #69 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Williamsburg, Virginia
Average GMAT: 593; Average GPA: 3.3
Part-time enrollment: 180
Duration: 36 months
Total Tuition Cost: $37,800 (in-state); $59,400 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 54 credits at $700 (in-state) or $1,100 (out-of-state)
The College of William and Mary is the second-oldest institute of higher education in the country. Through the flex MBA program, students take classes weekday evenings for about three years. The Flex MBA combines leadership, hard work, integrity, and innovation that will be the cornerstones of the new economy.

Virginia Commonwealth University
Ranked #112 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Richmond, Virginia
Average GMAT: 528; Average GPA: 3.37
Part-time enrollment: 180
Duration: 36 months
Total Tuition Cost: $30,153 (in-state); $62,073 (out-of-state)
Cost/Credit: 57 credits at $529 (in-state) or $1,089 (out-of-state)

Located in downtown Richmond, the Virginia Commonwealth University MBA program offers a combination of business theory, practical application, and a valuable network of career contacts. The MBA program has a total of 19 courses. The first seven are foundation courses and cover the core concepts in business discipline. The advanced program is 12 courses broken out into 9 core courses that all students complete and 3 electives which allow students to concentrate in a particular area. Instruction combines lecture with case study, game theory, and group project activities.

Other part-time ranked MBA programs in Virginia include Old Dominion University (#117) in Norfolk, Radford University (#136) in Radford, Shenandoah University (Listed But Rank Not Published) in Winchester. In addition, while Darden School of Business at the University of Virginia in Charlottesville has a ranked full-time MBA program, it does not offer a part-time MBA program.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Original article:

Comparing Ranked MBA Programs in Virginia

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Specializations Offered at Top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs http://asiancorrespondent.com/109332/specializations-offered-at-top-washington-d-c-mba-programs/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/109332/specializations-offered-at-top-washington-d-c-mba-programs/#comments Mon, 17 Jun 2013 11:38:54 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/109332/specializations-offered-at-top-washington-d-c-mba-programs/ We looked at the specializations offered at five top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs including George Mason University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, American University, and Howard University.

Each of these top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs offers a variety of electives and areas of concentrations to their students. Areas of emphasis vary by MBA program and some programs also offer dual degree options. It’s important to find a program that has the intellectual capital and professional expertise in the area in which you want to specialize. Here is a breakdown of the areas of emphasis offered for each of the top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs:

George Mason University MBA Program

Accounting Entrepreneurship Financial Management Information Systems Management International Business Leadership Marketing Project Management Real Estate

After completing the core MBA Program curriculum, George Mason students may use their 15 credits in electives in one of the defined areas of emphasis. Alternatively, students may choose any electives that meet their interests. One of the most popular specializations is finance. It is a hot topic for many students pursuing their MBA because there is a strong demand in the labor market for those studying finance. Mason’s MBA in Finance is designed to prepare students for high caliber professional, managerial or investment careers in both the private and public sectors.

Another popular area of emphasis is entrepreneurship. George Mason offers a variety of programs, conferences, and academic courses designed to fully integrate entrepreneurship into the lives of students and alumni. These initiatives are led by Entrepreneur in Residence, Jim Wolfe, and the Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Mahesh Joshi. George Mason has a large entrepreneurial alumni base and is uniquely integrated into the regional startup community.

Georgetown University MBA Program

McDonough MBA students begin the program by taking core classes. Starting in the second year, students begin to tailor the curriculum to meet their interests and current or future professional needs by taking elective courses in addition to core classes. Students have 18 credits of electives. McDonough also offers the following dual degree programs:

Walsh School of Foreign Service (MBA/MSFS) Georgetown University Law Center (MBA/JD) Georgetown University School of Medicine (MBA/MD) Georgetown Public Policy Institute (MBA/MPP)

George Washington MBA Program

Healthcare

 

In the second year of the program, GW MBA students have the flexibility to customize their curriculum by taking electives from 16 different areas. Through special credit-hour transfer arrangements, students may earn an MBA and another degree at GW: JD with the Law School, Master of Arts with the Elliott School of International Affairs, Master of Science in Finance, Project Management or Information Systems Technology.

 

American University MBA Program

Kogod students take 36 credit hours of the core curriculum and have 18 credits of electives to use toward a specialization. Many choose to create their own area of emphasis tailored to suit their specific academic interest such as consulting, entrepreneurship, finance, information technology, international development, or sustainability management. Kogod also offers dual degrees including MA/MBA, JD/MBA, and LLM/MBA with AU’s School of International Service and Washington College of Law.

 

Howard University MBA Program

Accounting Entrepreneurship Finance Information Systems International Business Management Marketing Supply Chain Management

In addition to the core curriculum requirements, Howard MBA students must complete 15 credit hours of elective/concentration course. The accounting concentration is a five-year accounting degree program restricted to Howard University undergraduate accounting majors who graduated May 1997 or later.
No matter what concentration or specialization you are honing in on, finding the program that offers your specialty is key to your success and happiness with your MBA degree and in your future career. A great deal of time and funds will be dedicated to your MBA program—be sure to focus on the concentration that appeals the most to you, so you can truly benefit from the learning being offered.

*Data obtained from individual university websites.

]]>

We looked at the specializations offered at five top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs including George Mason University, Georgetown University, George Washington University, American University, and Howard University.

Each of these top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs offers a variety of electives and areas of concentrations to their students. Areas of emphasis vary by MBA program and some programs also offer dual degree options. It’s important to find a program that has the intellectual capital and professional expertise in the area in which you want to specialize. Here is a breakdown of the areas of emphasis offered for each of the top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs:

George Mason University MBA Program

Accounting
Entrepreneurship
Financial Management
Information Systems Management
International Business
Leadership
Marketing
Project Management
Real Estate

After completing the core MBA Program curriculum, George Mason students may use their 15 credits in electives in one of the defined areas of emphasis. Alternatively, students may choose any electives that meet their interests. One of the most popular specializations is finance. It is a hot topic for many students pursuing their MBA because there is a strong demand in the labor market for those studying finance. Mason’s MBA in Finance is designed to prepare students for high caliber professional, managerial or investment careers in both the private and public sectors.

Another popular area of emphasis is entrepreneurship. George Mason offers a variety of programs, conferences, and academic courses designed to fully integrate entrepreneurship into the lives of students and alumni. These initiatives are led by Entrepreneur in Residence, Jim Wolfe, and the Director of Innovation and Entrepreneurship, Mahesh Joshi. George Mason has a large entrepreneurial alumni base and is uniquely integrated into the regional startup community.

Georgetown University MBA Program

McDonough MBA students begin the program by taking core classes. Starting in the second year, students begin to tailor the curriculum to meet their interests and current or future professional needs by taking elective courses in addition to core classes. Students have 18 credits of electives. McDonough also offers the following dual degree programs:

Walsh School of Foreign Service (MBA/MSFS)
Georgetown University Law Center (MBA/JD)
Georgetown University School of Medicine (MBA/MD)
Georgetown Public Policy Institute (MBA/MPP)

George Washington MBA Program

Healthcare

 

In the second year of the program, GW MBA students have the flexibility to customize their curriculum by taking electives from 16 different areas. Through special credit-hour transfer arrangements, students may earn an MBA and another degree at GW: JD with the Law School, Master of Arts with the Elliott School of International Affairs, Master of Science in Finance, Project Management or Information Systems Technology.

 

American University MBA Program

Kogod students take 36 credit hours of the core curriculum and have 18 credits of electives to use toward a specialization. Many choose to create their own area of emphasis tailored to suit their specific academic interest such as consulting, entrepreneurship, finance, information technology, international development, or sustainability management. Kogod also offers dual degrees including MA/MBA, JD/MBA, and LLM/MBA with AU’s School of International Service and Washington College of Law.

 

Howard University MBA Program

Accounting
Entrepreneurship
Finance
Information Systems
International Business
Management
Marketing
Supply Chain Management

In addition to the core curriculum requirements, Howard MBA students must complete 15 credit hours of elective/concentration course. The accounting concentration is a five-year accounting degree program restricted to Howard University undergraduate accounting majors who graduated May 1997 or later.
No matter what concentration or specialization you are honing in on, finding the program that offers your specialty is key to your success and happiness with your MBA degree and in your future career. A great deal of time and funds will be dedicated to your MBA program—be sure to focus on the concentration that appeals the most to you, so you can truly benefit from the learning being offered.

*Data obtained from individual university websites.

Original source: 

Specializations Offered at Top Washington, D.C. MBA Programs

]]>
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Researching Faculty at Washington, D.C. MBA Programs http://asiancorrespondent.com/108415/researching-faculty-at-washington-d-c-mba-programs/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/108415/researching-faculty-at-washington-d-c-mba-programs/#comments Wed, 29 May 2013 10:44:39 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/108415/researching-faculty-at-washington-d-c-mba-programs/ Can you remember what your best learning experience was in your lifetime? Which class taught you the most? What one thing made the difference in your learning? If you think back on all the years of education you’ve experienced in your life from Kindergarten to now, most people would answer that a good teacher made the difference. Now think about today. What do you think is one of the biggest indicators of your learning success? Faculty. What’s one of the most important things to consider when searching for Washington, D.C. MBA programs? Faculty. What’s one of the items folks tend to forget to look at when researching MBA programs? Faculty.

Although it will be difficult to know which professor will have the biggest impact on your life, it’s important to consider the backgrounds of those teaching you. Where did they receive their degrees? Are they currently actively conducting research? What professional experience do they have that they can share with you?  Consider this information as you conduct your research and define your path to a MBA.

In the Washington, D.C. MBA programs, there is a plethora of highly educated faculty with a great deal of academic and professional experience to offer students. Here’s a short break down about the faculty at each of the top ranked Washington, D.C. MBA Programs.*

George Mason University
At George Mason’s School of Management, faculty provide students with real world insights, a strong theoretical base, and applied learning opportunities that will create a solid foundation for your business future. It’s more than a textbook – it’s about experiential learning. In the Mason MBA program, you learn from instructors that have achieved international renown for their groundbreaking work in areas such as executive compensation, effects of insider trading on stock and e-commerce, and internal work groups and teams. You will have a chance to work with and learn from instructors that are on the cutting edge in their fields of expertise.

In addition, the Mason MBA faculty has on-going partnerships and relationships with business leaders in the Washington, D.C., metro area. These relationships give you a chance to learn in a real-world business environment and gain a much deeper understanding of specific industries that helps them achieve their career goals.

In the classroom, our instructors incorporate daily opportunities to connect business theory with business practice. Role-playing, simulations, projects, and guest speakers are used to illuminate learning from textbooks, lectures and discussions. Our instructors use the Harvard Case Study method so you spend your time thinking about real business problems, not just theory.

As you move through the George Mason University MBA program, your appreciation for your professor’s applied knowledge will grow. You’ll absorb the lessons they have learned during their decades in the business world and be able to apply them yourself.

Georgetown University
The faculty at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business represents a diversity of intellectual perspectives and a depth of professional experience. Faculty members regularly contribute to scholarly and trade publications, participate in ongoing debates and conferences, publish pioneering books and papers, and serve as consultants to businesses, governments, and non-governmental agencies throughout the world.

George Washington University
MBA students are taught by 130 full-time faculty members at the School of Business. The school’s commitment to excellence in learning is further strengthened by the location in Washington, D.C., where they draw on the knowledge of skilled practitioners in finance, business-government relations, and international business. These professionals share their experiences with students in the classroom as guest speakers and adjunct faculty members.

American University
At Kogod, faculty are dedicated to researching cutting-edge issues, and delivering the knowledge and experience students need to pursue the many career tracks available to them. Faculty members are well-known researchers and distinguished professionals comprised of some leading researchers in the field. Faculty members also make use of Kogod’s Washington, D.C. location to invite leaders from local corporations, regulatory and government agencies to speak at Kogod.

Howard University
At Howard, faculty train students to provide them with the necessary knowledge, skills, tools and essential values needed to become competent, ethical managers in any for-profit or non-profit organization they choose to work for or to function successfully as entrepreneurs. Faculty strive to achieve excellence, professionalism and recognition in teaching, faculty research, and community activity; to provide students with a top quality management education.

Whether you’re looking at Washington, D.C. MBA programs or MBA programs in another location, always be sure to evaluate the faculty that will serve as your teachers, mentors, and partners. Try to take advantage of all opportunities available to you with faculty. Faculty are often available during office hours to offer their insights into various fields of study, research, or career paths and can provide you with invaluable information to enhance your learning outside of the classroom. And in the classroom, ask tough questions and make the most of your education. Each faculty member is there with a wealth of knowledge to share.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>

Can you remember what your best learning experience was in your lifetime? Which class taught you the most? What one thing made the difference in your learning? If you think back on all the years of education you’ve experienced in your life from Kindergarten to now, most people would answer that a good teacher made the difference. Now think about today. What do you think is one of the biggest indicators of your learning success? Faculty. What’s one of the most important things to consider when searching for Washington, D.C. MBA programs? Faculty. What’s one of the items folks tend to forget to look at when researching MBA programs? Faculty.

Although it will be difficult to know which professor will have the biggest impact on your life, it’s important to consider the backgrounds of those teaching you. Where did they receive their degrees? Are they currently actively conducting research? What professional experience do they have that they can share with you?  Consider this information as you conduct your research and define your path to a MBA.

In the Washington, D.C. MBA programs, there is a plethora of highly educated faculty with a great deal of academic and professional experience to offer students. Here’s a short break down about the faculty at each of the top ranked Washington, D.C. MBA Programs.*

George Mason University
At George Mason’s School of Management, faculty provide students with real world insights, a strong theoretical base, and applied learning opportunities that will create a solid foundation for your business future. It’s more than a textbook – it’s about experiential learning. In the Mason MBA program, you learn from instructors that have achieved international renown for their groundbreaking work in areas such as executive compensation, effects of insider trading on stock and e-commerce, and internal work groups and teams. You will have a chance to work with and learn from instructors that are on the cutting edge in their fields of expertise.

In addition, the Mason MBA faculty has on-going partnerships and relationships with business leaders in the Washington, D.C., metro area. These relationships give you a chance to learn in a real-world business environment and gain a much deeper understanding of specific industries that helps them achieve their career goals.

In the classroom, our instructors incorporate daily opportunities to connect business theory with business practice. Role-playing, simulations, projects, and guest speakers are used to illuminate learning from textbooks, lectures and discussions. Our instructors use the Harvard Case Study method so you spend your time thinking about real business problems, not just theory.

As you move through the George Mason University MBA program, your appreciation for your professor’s applied knowledge will grow. You’ll absorb the lessons they have learned during their decades in the business world and be able to apply them yourself.

Georgetown University
The faculty at Georgetown’s McDonough School of Business represents a diversity of intellectual perspectives and a depth of professional experience. Faculty members regularly contribute to scholarly and trade publications, participate in ongoing debates and conferences, publish pioneering books and papers, and serve as consultants to businesses, governments, and non-governmental agencies throughout the world.

George Washington University
MBA students are taught by 130 full-time faculty members at the School of Business. The school’s commitment to excellence in learning is further strengthened by the location in Washington, D.C., where they draw on the knowledge of skilled practitioners in finance, business-government relations, and international business. These professionals share their experiences with students in the classroom as guest speakers and adjunct faculty members.

American University
At Kogod, faculty are dedicated to researching cutting-edge issues, and delivering the knowledge and experience students need to pursue the many career tracks available to them. Faculty members are well-known researchers and distinguished professionals comprised of some leading researchers in the field. Faculty members also make use of Kogod’s Washington, D.C. location to invite leaders from local corporations, regulatory and government agencies to speak at Kogod.

Howard University
At Howard, faculty train students to provide them with the necessary knowledge, skills, tools and essential values needed to become competent, ethical managers in any for-profit or non-profit organization they choose to work for or to function successfully as entrepreneurs. Faculty strive to achieve excellence, professionalism and recognition in teaching, faculty research, and community activity; to provide students with a top quality management education.

Whether you’re looking at Washington, D.C. MBA programs or MBA programs in another location, always be sure to evaluate the faculty that will serve as your teachers, mentors, and partners. Try to take advantage of all opportunities available to you with faculty. Faculty are often available during office hours to offer their insights into various fields of study, research, or career paths and can provide you with invaluable information to enhance your learning outside of the classroom. And in the classroom, ask tough questions and make the most of your education. Each faculty member is there with a wealth of knowledge to share.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Source:

Researching Faculty at Washington, D.C. MBA Programs

]]>
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Top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. – Format http://asiancorrespondent.com/108000/top-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-format/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/108000/top-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-format/#comments Tue, 21 May 2013 11:31:44 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/108000/top-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-format/ Finding the right MBA program for you takes a great deal of research, time and energy. Many programs contain the same elements, yet others have distinctive points that make them stand out among the rest. Weighing the format of each program is of great importance because it could make the difference in your learning and your ability to succeed. There are many top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. to consider. While each of these programs have the same benefit of a great location in Washington, D.C., there are many other features that make each stand out from each other.

Here’s a short break down of the format for each of the top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University

George Mason University School of Management offers a top quality MBA education at an affordable price. One of less than 10% of AACSB accredited business schools accredited in business and accounting, Mason’s MBA program has small class sizes and a cohort structure to optimize learning. The 48 credit hour program can be completed in as little as 18 months (traditional Mason MBA full-time program), which is within the timeframe for active military assigned to attend graduate school. Part-time MBA students can finish the coursework in as few as 23 months.
The Mason MBA degree prepares the next generation of world leaders through a rigorous, stimulating business and management curriculum based on an international perspective (required 7-10 day global residency) including a rich appreciation for other cultures and points-of-view.

Georgetown University

The accredited, rigorous, three-year program is specifically designed to support working professionals by providing the opportunity to earn a graduate business degree on a part-time basis while accelerating their careers. At Georgetown, business ethics is required. The 60 credits program in completed in a cohort structure. Students must complete a course titled Global Business Experience as part of their program where they complete consulting projects for international organizations in a number of locations, on various project topics.

George Washington University

The GW Global MBA (full-time) is comprised of 57 credit hours and divided into four modules with a summer in between.  Students can complete this degree is 16-21 months. Students attend classes in a cohort. As part of the Global MBA curriculum, all first-year students participate in one of several Consulting Abroad Projects (CAPs) in emerging markets such as Ghana, Brazil, Vietnam, Serbia and Turkey. The part-time MBA is not in a cohort and students can schedule classes as their schedule permits. The part-time MBA program takes 2-5 years to complete.

American University
The full-time MBA program (54 credits) takes 21 months to complete (4 semesters). Classes are offered in the day and evening. The part-time Professional MBA is designed for working professionals seeking to advance their career and takes 27 months to complete. Classes are offered year-round, one evening per week. The Professional MBA is a 48-credit hour program completed as a cohort. Students take one course at a time. Students also take part in week-long study abroad trip during their second year.

Howard University
Howard’s 54 credit MBA program provides a customizable learning experience to suit career aspirations, while leveraging the resources of a program that offers personal focus in and out of the classroom and a tight-knit community of peers from around the world. A final capstone course is offered for the MBA in Finance. Students who enroll in the part-time program may opt to participate in the accelerated part-time program, which requires completion in 3 rather than 4 years.

Not only is it important to consider items such as GMAT scores and GPAs, but it is very important to consider other distinctive elements when researching top MBA programs in Washington, D.C., such as international residency programs that offer you an unique first-hand global experience, or a diverse student body that allows you to learn business practices and customs from your peers. Program length is an important item to consider as the sooner you complete your program, the sooner you can begin advancing your career. The format of the MBA program you choose will make the difference in your learning and future career success.
*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>

Finding the right MBA program for you takes a great deal of research, time and energy. Many programs contain the same elements, yet others have distinctive points that make them stand out among the rest. Weighing the format of each program is of great importance because it could make the difference in your learning and your ability to succeed. There are many top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. to consider. While each of these programs have the same benefit of a great location in Washington, D.C., there are many other features that make each stand out from each other.

Here’s a short break down of the format for each of the top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University

George Mason University School of Management offers a top quality MBA education at an affordable price. One of less than 10% of AACSB accredited business schools accredited in business and accounting, Mason’s MBA program has small class sizes and a cohort structure to optimize learning. The 48 credit hour program can be completed in as little as 18 months (traditional Mason MBA full-time program), which is within the timeframe for active military assigned to attend graduate school. Part-time MBA students can finish the coursework in as few as 23 months.
The Mason MBA degree prepares the next generation of world leaders through a rigorous, stimulating business and management curriculum based on an international perspective (required 7-10 day global residency) including a rich appreciation for other cultures and points-of-view.

Georgetown University

The accredited, rigorous, three-year program is specifically designed to support working professionals by providing the opportunity to earn a graduate business degree on a part-time basis while accelerating their careers. At Georgetown, business ethics is required. The 60 credits program in completed in a cohort structure. Students must complete a course titled Global Business Experience as part of their program where they complete consulting projects for international organizations in a number of locations, on various project topics.

George Washington University

The GW Global MBA (full-time) is comprised of 57 credit hours and divided into four modules with a summer in between.  Students can complete this degree is 16-21 months. Students attend classes in a cohort. As part of the Global MBA curriculum, all first-year students participate in one of several Consulting Abroad Projects (CAPs) in emerging markets such as Ghana, Brazil, Vietnam, Serbia and Turkey. The part-time MBA is not in a cohort and students can schedule classes as their schedule permits. The part-time MBA program takes 2-5 years to complete.

American University
The full-time MBA program (54 credits) takes 21 months to complete (4 semesters). Classes are offered in the day and evening. The part-time Professional MBA is designed for working professionals seeking to advance their career and takes 27 months to complete. Classes are offered year-round, one evening per week. The Professional MBA is a 48-credit hour program completed as a cohort. Students take one course at a time. Students also take part in week-long study abroad trip during their second year.

Howard University
Howard’s 54 credit MBA program provides a customizable learning experience to suit career aspirations, while leveraging the resources of a program that offers personal focus in and out of the classroom and a tight-knit community of peers from around the world. A final capstone course is offered for the MBA in Finance. Students who enroll in the part-time program may opt to participate in the accelerated part-time program, which requires completion in 3 rather than 4 years.

Not only is it important to consider items such as GMAT scores and GPAs, but it is very important to consider other distinctive elements when researching top MBA programs in Washington, D.C., such as international residency programs that offer you an unique first-hand global experience, or a diverse student body that allows you to learn business practices and customs from your peers. Program length is an important item to consider as the sooner you complete your program, the sooner you can begin advancing your career. The format of the MBA program you choose will make the difference in your learning and future career success.
*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Link – 

Top MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. – Format

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Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. http://asiancorrespondent.com/107525/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/107525/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/#comments Fri, 10 May 2013 12:02:06 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/107525/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/ The Washington, D.C. area offers many advantages for those looking to begin or continue their career. Washington, D.C., is home to more than 1,000 international firms from 50 countries. More and more multinational companies are coming to the National Capital Region to take advantage of what our region has to offer. According to Inc Magazine’s Best of the Inc 5000 list published in 2012, Washington, D.C., has the second largest number of companies in America. And just this week, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that our area’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.3%.

The Washington, D.C., region is growing each day, offering our MBA students more opportunities to join a wide range of organizations from global corporations to nonprofits, government agencies to government contractors, and technology corporations to health services.

According to a variety of estimates from CBS, NPR, MSNBC, and CNN, about 80% of jobs get filled before ever being formally listed as available. This means the age old saying, “It’s not what you know, but who you know” still holds true. Job placement is in large part focused on networking—and a business school must help students build their network and search for jobs.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., one of the most important items to consider is one that is often overlooked: career services. Many times students are only learning about the resources available to them through career services towards the end of their program, when they are getting ready to graduate. But this is a big mistake. Students should take advantage of all career and networking opportunities throughout their degree program.

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University
George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, and government agencies. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of organizations including AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, U.S. government leadership, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 66.6%

Georgetown University
Students can access customized career services from the MBA Career Center year-round. Breaks in the fall and spring term provide opportunities for Career Weeks. During this time off from class, students focus on professional development and explore career opportunities. Alumni of the McDonough School of Business include Michael Chasen, president, CEO, and cofounder of Blackboard, Inc.; Timothy Tassopoulos, senior vice president of operations at fast food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A; and Stephanie Olson, general counsel for Fifth Avenue Financial.

 Salary
Average base salary: $99,799
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  67.9%
George Washington University
The F. David Fowler Career Center is committed to assisting students with resources and strategies for putting their education to work. The center offers tools such as self-assessment, market research, experiential learning, strategic career planning and execution. Graduates from George Washington University’s School of Business will join an alumni network that includes Gen. Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Carolyn Schwab-Pomerantz, president of the Charles Schwab Foundation; George Wellde, former partner and vice chairman of Goldman Sachs; and Olympian Michelle D. Knox-Zaloom, who competed in women’s rowing in the 1992 and 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Salary
Average base salary: $84,208
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  55.7%

American University
Students have access to career management workshops throughout the Professional MBA program. Career management advisors are also available for on-campus appointments during the day, evening, or by phone.

Salary:
Average base salary: $68,540
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 44.7%

Howard University
Business students and alumni at Howard can make the most of their academics by visiting the Center for Professional Development, which assists them in interviewing, networking, and finding jobs. After graduating, students can join the Howard School of Business Alumni Network of nearly 7,000 graduates, which helps former students reconnect and raise money for scholarships.

Salary:
Average base salary: $92,455
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 54.8%

Choosing an MBA program takes a great deal of research and consideration. Students must weigh location, curriculum, faculty, program structure, and cost, amongst other things. But it is vital to consider the career services that MBA programs offer.

When comparing top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., be sure that the career services offered will meet the level of assistance you need to find the right job for you. A wonderful education and expert experience will never be able to be used without finding the right job to put these skills to work. That’s how the career services at your chosen MBA program will make the difference for your career and your life.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>

The Washington, D.C. area offers many advantages for those looking to begin or continue their career. Washington, D.C., is home to more than 1,000 international firms from 50 countries. More and more multinational companies are coming to the National Capital Region to take advantage of what our region has to offer. According to Inc Magazine’s Best of the Inc 5000 list published in 2012, Washington, D.C., has the second largest number of companies in America. And just this week, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that our area’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.3%.

The Washington, D.C., region is growing each day, offering our MBA students more opportunities to join a wide range of organizations from global corporations to nonprofits, government agencies to government contractors, and technology corporations to health services.

According to a variety of estimates from CBS, NPR, MSNBC, and CNN, about 80% of jobs get filled before ever being formally listed as available. This means the age old saying, “It’s not what you know, but who you know” still holds true. Job placement is in large part focused on networking—and a business school must help students build their network and search for jobs.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., one of the most important items to consider is one that is often overlooked: career services. Many times students are only learning about the resources available to them through career services towards the end of their program, when they are getting ready to graduate. But this is a big mistake. Students should take advantage of all career and networking opportunities throughout their degree program.

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University
George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, and government agencies. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of organizations including AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, U.S. government leadership, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 66.6%

Georgetown University
Students can access customized career services from the MBA Career Center year-round. Breaks in the fall and spring term provide opportunities for Career Weeks. During this time off from class, students focus on professional development and explore career opportunities. Alumni of the McDonough School of Business include Michael Chasen, president, CEO, and cofounder of Blackboard, Inc.; Timothy Tassopoulos, senior vice president of operations at fast food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A; and Stephanie Olson, general counsel for Fifth Avenue Financial.

 Salary
Average base salary: $99,799
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  67.9%
George Washington University
The F. David Fowler Career Center is committed to assisting students with resources and strategies for putting their education to work. The center offers tools such as self-assessment, market research, experiential learning, strategic career planning and execution. Graduates from George Washington University’s School of Business will join an alumni network that includes Gen. Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Carolyn Schwab-Pomerantz, president of the Charles Schwab Foundation; George Wellde, former partner and vice chairman of Goldman Sachs; and Olympian Michelle D. Knox-Zaloom, who competed in women’s rowing in the 1992 and 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Salary
Average base salary: $84,208
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  55.7%

American University
Students have access to career management workshops throughout the Professional MBA program. Career management advisors are also available for on-campus appointments during the day, evening, or by phone.

Salary:
Average base salary: $68,540
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 44.7%

Howard University
Business students and alumni at Howard can make the most of their academics by visiting the Center for Professional Development, which assists them in interviewing, networking, and finding jobs. After graduating, students can join the Howard School of Business Alumni Network of nearly 7,000 graduates, which helps former students reconnect and raise money for scholarships.

Salary:
Average base salary: $92,455
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 54.8%

Choosing an MBA program takes a great deal of research and consideration. Students must weigh location, curriculum, faculty, program structure, and cost, amongst other things. But it is vital to consider the career services that MBA programs offer.

When comparing top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., be sure that the career services offered will meet the level of assistance you need to find the right job for you. A wonderful education and expert experience will never be able to be used without finding the right job to put these skills to work. That’s how the career services at your chosen MBA program will make the difference for your career and your life.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Original post: 

Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C.

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Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. – Career Services http://asiancorrespondent.com/108093/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-career-services/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/108093/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-career-services/#comments Fri, 10 May 2013 12:02:06 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/108093/ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c-career-services/ The Washington, D.C. area offers many advantages for those looking to begin or continue their career. Washington, D.C., is home to more than 1,000 international firms from 50 countries. More and more multinational companies are coming to the National Capital Region to take advantage of what our region has to offer. According to Inc Magazine’s Best of the Inc 5000 list published in 2012, Washington, D.C., has the second largest number of companies in America. And just this week, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that our area’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.3%.

The Washington, D.C., region is growing each day, offering our MBA students more opportunities to join a wide range of organizations from global corporations to nonprofits, government agencies to government contractors, and technology corporations to health services.

According to a variety of estimates from CBS, NPR, MSNBC, and CNN, about 80% of jobs get filled before ever being formally listed as available. This means the age old saying, “It’s not what you know, but who you know” still holds true. Job placement is in large part focused on networking—and a business school must help students build their network and search for jobs.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., one of the most important items to consider is one that is often overlooked: career services. Many times students are only learning about the resources available to them through career services towards the end of their program, when they are getting ready to graduate. But this is a big mistake. Students should take advantage of all career and networking opportunities throughout their degree program.

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University
George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, and government agencies. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of organizations including AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, U.S. government leadership, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 66.6%

Georgetown University
Students can access customized career services from the MBA Career Center year-round. Breaks in the fall and spring term provide opportunities for Career Weeks. During this time off from class, students focus on professional development and explore career opportunities. Alumni of the McDonough School of Business include Michael Chasen, president, CEO, and cofounder of Blackboard, Inc.; Timothy Tassopoulos, senior vice president of operations at fast food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A; and Stephanie Olson, general counsel for Fifth Avenue Financial.

 Salary
Average base salary: $99,799
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  67.9%
George Washington University
The F. David Fowler Career Center is committed to assisting students with resources and strategies for putting their education to work. The center offers tools such as self-assessment, market research, experiential learning, strategic career planning and execution. Graduates from George Washington University’s School of Business will join an alumni network that includes Gen. Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Carolyn Schwab-Pomerantz, president of the Charles Schwab Foundation; George Wellde, former partner and vice chairman of Goldman Sachs; and Olympian Michelle D. Knox-Zaloom, who competed in women’s rowing in the 1992 and 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Salary
Average base salary: $84,208
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  55.7%

American University
Students have access to career management workshops throughout the Professional MBA program. Career management advisors are also available for on-campus appointments during the day, evening, or by phone.

Salary:
Average base salary: $68,540
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 44.7%

Howard University
Business students and alumni at Howard can make the most of their academics by visiting the Center for Professional Development, which assists them in interviewing, networking, and finding jobs. After graduating, students can join the Howard School of Business Alumni Network of nearly 7,000 graduates, which helps former students reconnect and raise money for scholarships.

Salary:
Average base salary: $92,455
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 54.8%

Choosing an MBA program takes a great deal of research and consideration. Students must weigh location, curriculum, faculty, program structure, and cost, amongst other things. But it is vital to consider the career services that MBA programs offer.

When comparing top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., be sure that the career services offered will meet the level of assistance you need to find the right job for you. A wonderful education and expert experience will never be able to be used without finding the right job to put these skills to work. That’s how the career services at your chosen MBA program will make the difference for your career and your life.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

]]>

The Washington, D.C. area offers many advantages for those looking to begin or continue their career. Washington, D.C., is home to more than 1,000 international firms from 50 countries. More and more multinational companies are coming to the National Capital Region to take advantage of what our region has to offer. According to Inc Magazine’s Best of the Inc 5000 list published in 2012, Washington, D.C., has the second largest number of companies in America. And just this week, the U.S. Department of Labor reported that our area’s unemployment rate dropped to 5.3%.

The Washington, D.C., region is growing each day, offering our MBA students more opportunities to join a wide range of organizations from global corporations to nonprofits, government agencies to government contractors, and technology corporations to health services.

According to a variety of estimates from CBS, NPR, MSNBC, and CNN, about 80% of jobs get filled before ever being formally listed as available. This means the age old saying, “It’s not what you know, but who you know” still holds true. Job placement is in large part focused on networking—and a business school must help students build their network and search for jobs.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., one of the most important items to consider is one that is often overlooked: career services. Many times students are only learning about the resources available to them through career services towards the end of their program, when they are getting ready to graduate. But this is a big mistake. Students should take advantage of all career and networking opportunities throughout their degree program.

Here’s a short break down of the career services for each of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C.*

George Mason University
George Mason University’s career services department has deep connections with a wide network of global companies, regional startups, and government agencies. Our career consultants connect students with a diverse group of organizations including AT&T, Booz Allen Hamilton, the CIA, Northrop Grumman, Capital One, and Microsoft. These connections ensure you have an opportunity to network and interact frequently with potential employers.

Our dedicated career consultants take an active role in your professional advancement, providing tailored consultations to help you develop a road map to meet your professional development goals. The George Mason MBA program provides individual services such as mock interviews and résumé evaluations, hosts recruiters for employment and networking opportunities, and provides numerous online resources to help you take advantage of your degree once you graduate. All School of Management alumni retain access to our career services staff that can assist you throughout your professional career. Our network of more than 25,000 business alumni span the globe and include Fortune 500 CFOs, nonprofit executives, U.S. government leadership, and entrepreneurs.

Salary:
Average base salary: $89,434
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 66.6%

Georgetown University
Students can access customized career services from the MBA Career Center year-round. Breaks in the fall and spring term provide opportunities for Career Weeks. During this time off from class, students focus on professional development and explore career opportunities. Alumni of the McDonough School of Business include Michael Chasen, president, CEO, and cofounder of Blackboard, Inc.; Timothy Tassopoulos, senior vice president of operations at fast food restaurant chain Chick-fil-A; and Stephanie Olson, general counsel for Fifth Avenue Financial.

 Salary
Average base salary: $99,799
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  67.9%
George Washington University
The F. David Fowler Career Center is committed to assisting students with resources and strategies for putting their education to work. The center offers tools such as self-assessment, market research, experiential learning, strategic career planning and execution. Graduates from George Washington University’s School of Business will join an alumni network that includes Gen. Colin Powell, former U.S. Secretary of State and chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff; Carolyn Schwab-Pomerantz, president of the Charles Schwab Foundation; George Wellde, former partner and vice chairman of Goldman Sachs; and Olympian Michelle D. Knox-Zaloom, who competed in women’s rowing in the 1992 and 1996 Summer Olympic Games.

Salary
Average base salary: $84,208
Full-time graduates employed at graduation:  55.7%

American University
Students have access to career management workshops throughout the Professional MBA program. Career management advisors are also available for on-campus appointments during the day, evening, or by phone.

Salary:
Average base salary: $68,540
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 44.7%

Howard University
Business students and alumni at Howard can make the most of their academics by visiting the Center for Professional Development, which assists them in interviewing, networking, and finding jobs. After graduating, students can join the Howard School of Business Alumni Network of nearly 7,000 graduates, which helps former students reconnect and raise money for scholarships.

Salary:
Average base salary: $92,455
Full-time graduates employed at graduation: 54.8%

Choosing an MBA program takes a great deal of research and consideration. Students must weigh location, curriculum, faculty, program structure, and cost, amongst other things. But it is vital to consider the career services that MBA programs offer.

When comparing top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C., be sure that the career services offered will meet the level of assistance you need to find the right job for you. A wonderful education and expert experience will never be able to be used without finding the right job to put these skills to work. That’s how the career services at your chosen MBA program will make the difference for your career and your life.

*Data obtained from U.S. News & World Report and individual university websites.

Link: 

Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. – Career Services

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Top Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C. http://asiancorrespondent.com/107277/top-ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/107277/top-ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/#comments Mon, 06 May 2013 06:40:24 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/107277/top-ranked-mba-programs-in-washington-d-c/ You will find some of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C. – the prime location at the intersection of government, technology, and business.

U.S. News and World Report annually ranks all AACSB accredited business schools’ part-time MBA programs based on peer assessment, GMAT average, work experience, % of part-time students, and undergraduate GPA. To put these MBA program rankings in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs. U.S. News & World Report considers only the 672 member institutions (AACSB-accredited business schools) in the U.S. for these rankings.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C, there are five ranked MBA Programs in the region:

George Mason University School of Management George Washington University School of Business Georgetown University McDonough School of Business Howard University School of Business American University Kogod School of Business

 

Here’s a short overview of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C:

 

Georgetown University McDonough School of Business
Ranked #11 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 686; Average GPA: 3.31
Part-time enrollment: 377

60 credits; Tuition Cost: $87,300

The school uses a cohort structure and team-centered practices while following the school’s core values of learning, having a global mindset, integrity, professionalism, and community.

George Washington University School of Business
Ranked #60 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 582; Average GPA: 3.25
Part-time enrollment: 409.

57 credits; Tuition Cost: $80,940
Cohort structure. In addition to traditional business competencies, all MBA programs are infused with ethics, and focuses on sustainability, social responsibility and corporate citizenship

George Mason University School of Management
Ranked #93 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 612; Average GPA: 3.2
Part-time enrollment: 267

48 credits Tuition Cost: $39,840 (in-state) $71,328 (out-of-state)

Cohort structure. Small class sizes, diverse student body, expert faculty, and a required global residency are staples of the part-time program that can be completed in as few as 23 months. Students have the option of enrolling on the Fairfax or Arlington campuses.

American University Kogod School of Business
Ranked #121 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 575; Average GPA: 3.2
54 credits: Tuition Cost: $68,094

No cohort structure. Offers students an opportunity to integrate business education by combining their study of management with another discipline that will enhance their ability to lead with vision in a rapidly changing global business environment.

Howard University School of Business
Listed But Rank Not Published – Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
54 credits; Tuition Cost: $93,960
To study at Howard University is choosing an institution that is experienced, dynamic, and diverse–with a tradition of quality education. In 2006 by the Princeton Review, as it assessed the MBA program as number one for “Greatest Opportunities for Minority Students.”

]]>

You will find some of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C. – the prime location at the intersection of government, technology, and business.

U.S. News and World Report annually ranks all AACSB accredited business schools’ part-time MBA programs based on peer assessment, GMAT average, work experience, % of part-time students, and undergraduate GPA. To put these MBA program rankings in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs. U.S. News & World Report considers only the 672 member institutions (AACSB-accredited business schools) in the U.S. for these rankings.

For those considering top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C, there are five ranked MBA Programs in the region:

George Mason University School of Management
George Washington University School of Business
Georgetown University McDonough School of Business
Howard University School of Business
American University Kogod School of Business

 

Here’s a short overview of the top ranked MBA programs in Washington, D.C:

 

Georgetown University McDonough School of Business
Ranked #11 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 686; Average GPA: 3.31
Part-time enrollment: 377

60 credits; Tuition Cost: $87,300

The school uses a cohort structure and team-centered practices while following the school’s core values of learning, having a global mindset, integrity, professionalism, and community.

George Washington University School of Business
Ranked #60 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 582; Average GPA: 3.25
Part-time enrollment: 409.

57 credits; Tuition Cost: $80,940
Cohort structure. In addition to traditional business competencies, all MBA programs are infused with ethics, and focuses on sustainability, social responsibility and corporate citizenship

George Mason University School of Management
Ranked #93 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 612; Average GPA: 3.2
Part-time enrollment: 267

48 credits Tuition Cost: $39,840 (in-state) $71,328 (out-of-state)

Cohort structure. Small class sizes, diverse student body, expert faculty, and a required global residency are staples of the part-time program that can be completed in as few as 23 months. Students have the option of enrolling on the Fairfax or Arlington campuses.

American University Kogod School of Business
Ranked #121 Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
Average GMAT: 575; Average GPA: 3.2
54 credits: Tuition Cost: $68,094

No cohort structure. Offers students an opportunity to integrate business education by combining their study of management with another discipline that will enhance their ability to lead with vision in a rapidly changing global business environment.

Howard University School of Business
Listed But Rank Not Published – Best Part-Time MBA Programs in U.S. News & World Report
54 credits; Tuition Cost: $93,960
To study at Howard University is choosing an institution that is experienced, dynamic, and diverse–with a tradition of quality education. In 2006 by the Princeton Review, as it assessed the MBA program as number one for “Greatest Opportunities for Minority Students.”

Original article:  

Top Ranked MBA Programs in Washington, D.C.

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Higher Education: A Wise Investment http://asiancorrespondent.com/107146/higher-education-a-wise-investment/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/107146/higher-education-a-wise-investment/#comments Fri, 03 May 2013 04:00:43 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/107146/higher-education-a-wise-investment/ Higher Education: A Wise Investment

Source: mbaprograms411.com via Kelly on Pinterest

Although expanding on your current skill-set may be key to propelling your career forward, many individuals find themselves confronted with multiple dilemmas. Monetary or occupational concerns revolving around college enrollment may dampen your ambitions. You may even find yourself asking, “Is pursuing a higher level of education right for me?” No matter what drawbacks you face during your academic journey, the benefits far outweigh the trials. Listed below are a few vital points we extracted from the above infographic regarding why furthering your education is a wise investment.

Affordability remains a critical complaint when it comes to American colleges. Upon viewing the above infographic, a whopping 75% of Americans surveyed answered ‘No’ when asked if college is affordable. However, a typical college graduate earns an estimated $650,000 over the course of a 40-year work life. Although this information is highly dependent on your field of study, college graduates have the potential to earn quadruple, even quintuple, the amount spent on education within their lifetime.

Career advancement and satisfaction prove to be the average result once the higher education equation is complete. Studies show less than 40% of high school graduates expressed satisfaction with their level of education, while an astounding 90% of MBA graduates were cited as being very satisfied.

To reiterate, no matter what career path you choose, investing your time and money into higher education will always be a wise decision. For more intriguing facts about obtaining a college or graduate school degree, check out the infographic above.

, , , , , ,

About Paige Wolf

As director of graduate programs at George Mason's School of Management, my vision is to have a vibrant, collegial community of active learners who develop enduring professional relationships with faculty, staff, and fellow students while pursuing their degrees. Prior to this position, I spent 11 years with the School of Management as an associate professor of management teaching both MBA and undergraduate courses in organizational behavior and human resource management. I have more than 16 years of experience as an internal and external consultant on strategic human resource initiatives including team building, organizational development, competency modelling, performance management, employee selection systems, career planning, employee training and development, leadership assessment, and human resource audits.

View all posts by Paige Wolf ]]>

Higher Education: A Wise Investment

Source: mbaprograms411.com via Kelly on Pinterest

Although expanding on your current skill-set may be key to propelling your career forward, many individuals find themselves confronted with multiple dilemmas. Monetary or occupational concerns revolving around college enrollment may dampen your ambitions. You may even find yourself asking, “Is pursuing a higher level of education right for me?” No matter what drawbacks you face during your academic journey, the benefits far outweigh the trials. Listed below are a few vital points we extracted from the above infographic regarding why furthering your education is a wise investment.

Affordability remains a critical complaint when it comes to American colleges. Upon viewing the above infographic, a whopping 75% of Americans surveyed answered ‘No’ when asked if college is affordable. However, a typical college graduate earns an estimated $650,000 over the course of a 40-year work life. Although this information is highly dependent on your field of study, college graduates have the potential to earn quadruple, even quintuple, the amount spent on education within their lifetime.

Career advancement and satisfaction prove to be the average result once the higher education equation is complete. Studies show less than 40% of high school graduates expressed satisfaction with their level of education, while an astounding 90% of MBA graduates were cited as being very satisfied.

To reiterate, no matter what career path you choose, investing your time and money into higher education will always be a wise decision. For more intriguing facts about obtaining a college or graduate school degree, check out the infographic above.

, , , , , ,

About Paige Wolf

As director of graduate programs at George Mason’s School of Management, my vision is to have a vibrant, collegial community of active learners who develop enduring professional relationships with faculty, staff, and fellow students while pursuing their degrees.

Prior to this position, I spent 11 years with the School of Management as an associate professor of management teaching both MBA and undergraduate courses in organizational behavior and human resource management.

I have more than 16 years of experience as an internal and external consultant on strategic human resource initiatives including team building, organizational development, competency modelling, performance management, employee selection systems, career planning, employee training and development, leadership assessment, and human resource audits.


View all posts by Paige Wolf

Link:  

Higher Education: A Wise Investment

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Is AACSB Accreditation Important for an MBA Program? http://asiancorrespondent.com/108161/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program-2/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/108161/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program-2/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 07:59:52 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/108161/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program/ Every school strives to make their mark and offer the most to their students and community. But as a student, how do you know that the education you are receiving is of a good quality?  Accreditation is one important answer.  Students, faculty, administrators, and recruiters rely on a set of standards to evaluate and compare schools. For nearly 100 years, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) has set the standards for business education.


What is AACSB accreditation?
Established in 1916, AACSB is a global, nonprofit membership organization of educational institutions, businesses, and other entities devoted to the advancement of management education. In 1919, AACSB adopted a set of accreditation standards with the primary objective of improving collegiate business education. The organization defines accreditation as “a voluntary, non-governmental process that includes an external review of a school’s ability to provide quality programs.”

AACSB Accreditation & MBA Rankings
Throughout the years, the standards have been continually revised to reflect the ever-changing needs of business and students. Today, the AACSB Accreditation Standards are used as the basis to evaluate a business school’s mission, operations, faculty qualifications and contributions, programs, and other critical areas.

Seen as the gold standard of accreditation bodies for business schools, only AACSB accredited business schools are considered for U.S. News & World Report rankings.

Today, there are 672 member institutions that hold AACSB Accreditation. To put this number in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs.

All Accreditation is Not Equal
Many universities may claim to be an accredited school, but it’s important to recognize that all accreditation is not equal. In some countries around the world, a school may be accredited only in their country and that accreditation might not be recognized in another country. This could pose a challenge if a student is studying in one country but plans to work in another. In this case, it’s often a good idea to be sure the accrediting body is internationally recognized.

When a school has AACSB accreditation, it sends a message that it is one of the best business schools in the world—differentiating itself in terms of quality, rigor, and relevance. It takes a strong commitment by a business school to earn and maintain AACSB accreditation.

As a leader in the field of business education, George Mason University’s School of Management is a committed supporter of the AACSB mission and understands the value of AACSB membership as well as participating in AACSB committees and events.

George Mason’s School of Management has been AACSB accredited since 1991 and is one of only 10% of business schools worldwide accredited in both business and accounting.

As a potential MBA student, you must weigh many factors in choosing a business school. Be sure not to overlook an MBA program’s accreditation. Accreditation is what makes a business school stand out among the rest.

 

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Every school strives to make their mark and offer the most to their students and community. But as a student, how do you know that the education you are receiving is of a good quality?  Accreditation is one important answer.  Students, faculty, administrators, and recruiters rely on a set of standards to evaluate and compare schools. For nearly 100 years, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) has set the standards for business education.


What is AACSB accreditation?
Established in 1916, AACSB is a global, nonprofit membership organization of educational institutions, businesses, and other entities devoted to the advancement of management education. In 1919, AACSB adopted a set of accreditation standards with the primary objective of improving collegiate business education. The organization defines accreditation as “a voluntary, non-governmental process that includes an external review of a school’s ability to provide quality programs.”

AACSB Accreditation & MBA Rankings
Throughout the years, the standards have been continually revised to reflect the ever-changing needs of business and students. Today, the AACSB Accreditation Standards are used as the basis to evaluate a business school’s mission, operations, faculty qualifications and contributions, programs, and other critical areas.

Seen as the gold standard of accreditation bodies for business schools, only AACSB accredited business schools are considered for U.S. News & World Report rankings.

Today, there are 672 member institutions that hold AACSB Accreditation. To put this number in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs.

All Accreditation is Not Equal
Many universities may claim to be an accredited school, but it’s important to recognize that all accreditation is not equal. In some countries around the world, a school may be accredited only in their country and that accreditation might not be recognized in another country. This could pose a challenge if a student is studying in one country but plans to work in another. In this case, it’s often a good idea to be sure the accrediting body is internationally recognized.

When a school has AACSB accreditation, it sends a message that it is one of the best business schools in the world—differentiating itself in terms of quality, rigor, and relevance. It takes a strong commitment by a business school to earn and maintain AACSB accreditation.

As a leader in the field of business education, George Mason University’s School of Management is a committed supporter of the AACSB mission and understands the value of AACSB membership as well as participating in AACSB committees and events.

George Mason’s School of Management has been AACSB accredited since 1991 and is one of only 10% of business schools worldwide accredited in both business and accounting.

As a potential MBA student, you must weigh many factors in choosing a business school. Be sure not to overlook an MBA program’s accreditation. Accreditation is what makes a business school stand out among the rest.

 

Original link – 

Is AACSB Accreditation Important for an MBA Program?

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Is AACSB Accreditation Important for an MBA Program? http://asiancorrespondent.com/108162/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/108162/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 07:59:52 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/108162/is-aacsb-accreditation-important-for-an-mba-program/ Every school strives to make their mark and offer the most to their students and community. But as a student, how do you know that the education you are receiving is of a good quality?  Accreditation is one important answer.  Students, faculty, administrators, and recruiters rely on a set of standards to evaluate and compare schools. For nearly 100 years, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) has set the standards for business education.


What is AACSB accreditation?
Established in 1916, AACSB is a global, nonprofit membership organization of educational institutions, businesses, and other entities devoted to the advancement of management education. In 1919, AACSB adopted a set of accreditation standards with the primary objective of improving collegiate business education. The organization defines accreditation as “a voluntary, non-governmental process that includes an external review of a school’s ability to provide quality programs.”

AACSB Accreditation & MBA Rankings
Throughout the years, the standards have been continually revised to reflect the ever-changing needs of business and students. Today, the AACSB Accreditation Standards are used as the basis to evaluate a business school’s mission, operations, faculty qualifications and contributions, programs, and other critical areas.

Seen as the gold standard of accreditation bodies for business schools, only AACSB accredited business schools are considered for U.S. News & World Report rankings.

Today, there are 672 member institutions that hold AACSB Accreditation. To put this number in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs.

All Accreditation is Not Equal
Many universities may claim to be an accredited school, but it’s important to recognize that all accreditation is not equal. In some countries around the world, a school may be accredited only in their country and that accreditation might not be recognized in another country. This could pose a challenge if a student is studying in one country but plans to work in another. In this case, it’s often a good idea to be sure the accrediting body is internationally recognized.

When a school has AACSB accreditation, it sends a message that it is one of the best business schools in the world—differentiating itself in terms of quality, rigor, and relevance. It takes a strong commitment by a business school to earn and maintain AACSB accreditation.

As a leader in the field of business education, George Mason University’s School of Management is a committed supporter of the AACSB mission and understands the value of AACSB membership as well as participating in AACSB committees and events.

George Mason’s School of Management has been AACSB accredited since 1991 and is one of only 10% of business schools worldwide accredited in both business and accounting.

As a potential MBA student, you must weigh many factors in choosing a business school. Be sure not to overlook an MBA program’s accreditation. Accreditation is what makes a business school stand out among the rest.

 

]]>

Every school strives to make their mark and offer the most to their students and community. But as a student, how do you know that the education you are receiving is of a good quality?  Accreditation is one important answer.  Students, faculty, administrators, and recruiters rely on a set of standards to evaluate and compare schools. For nearly 100 years, the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International (AACSB) has set the standards for business education.


What is AACSB accreditation?
Established in 1916, AACSB is a global, nonprofit membership organization of educational institutions, businesses, and other entities devoted to the advancement of management education. In 1919, AACSB adopted a set of accreditation standards with the primary objective of improving collegiate business education. The organization defines accreditation as “a voluntary, non-governmental process that includes an external review of a school’s ability to provide quality programs.”

AACSB Accreditation & MBA Rankings
Throughout the years, the standards have been continually revised to reflect the ever-changing needs of business and students. Today, the AACSB Accreditation Standards are used as the basis to evaluate a business school’s mission, operations, faculty qualifications and contributions, programs, and other critical areas.

Seen as the gold standard of accreditation bodies for business schools, only AACSB accredited business schools are considered for U.S. News & World Report rankings.

Today, there are 672 member institutions that hold AACSB Accreditation. To put this number in perspective, there are more than 13,000 schools worldwide that offer business programs.

All Accreditation is Not Equal
Many universities may claim to be an accredited school, but it’s important to recognize that all accreditation is not equal. In some countries around the world, a school may be accredited only in their country and that accreditation might not be recognized in another country. This could pose a challenge if a student is studying in one country but plans to work in another. In this case, it’s often a good idea to be sure the accrediting body is internationally recognized.

When a school has AACSB accreditation, it sends a message that it is one of the best business schools in the world—differentiating itself in terms of quality, rigor, and relevance. It takes a strong commitment by a business school to earn and maintain AACSB accreditation.

As a leader in the field of business education, George Mason University’s School of Management is a committed supporter of the AACSB mission and understands the value of AACSB membership as well as participating in AACSB committees and events.

George Mason’s School of Management has been AACSB accredited since 1991 and is one of only 10% of business schools worldwide accredited in both business and accounting.

As a potential MBA student, you must weigh many factors in choosing a business school. Be sure not to overlook an MBA program’s accreditation. Accreditation is what makes a business school stand out among the rest.

 

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Is AACSB Accreditation Important for an MBA Program?

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GMAT Prep: Top Study Materials http://asiancorrespondent.com/106565/gmat-prep-top-study-materials/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/106565/gmat-prep-top-study-materials/#comments Mon, 22 Apr 2013 04:00:32 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/106565/gmat-prep-top-study-materials/ Individuals bent on advancing in their career field understand the effect GMAT scores have when applying for an MBA degree. With several GMAT preparatory methods available, locating leading resources may seem incomprehensible. For decades, students have invested their time in numerous publications meant specifically for GMAT prep. However, as the growth of technology enters numerous aspects of our daily lives, we’re noticing an undeniable GMAT prep shift from printed to electronic materials. A recent study shows 73% of college students own smartphones and roughly 30% own a tablet. Therefore, we at George Mason University would like to provide you with an all-inclusive list of recommended books and websites for GMAT prep.

Top Books:

Cracking the GMAT, 2011 Edition (Graduate School Test Preparation)

With an extensive collection of questions covering each GMAT section, two practice tests, and tips for maintaining an organized study plan, Cracking the GMAT is considered a top resource among MBA applicants.

Kaplan GMAT 800: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students (Kaplan Gmat Advanced)

If you’ve been looking for the most advanced GMAT prep book, the Kaplan GMAT 800: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students is meant for you. This book covers hundreds of the toughest practice questions, difficult concepts, and most revered testing strategies.

Kaplan New GMAT Premier 2013 with 5 Online Practice Tests (Kaplan Gmat Premier Live)

As an all-in-one guide composed specifically for students seeking test questions ranging from simple to complex, the Kaplan New GMAT Premier 2013 book has been deemed one of the leading study guides of 2013. Contents include prep questions covering multiple test sections, detailed answer explanations, and a thorough section dedicated entirely to Integrated Reasoning strategies/practice questions. Upon purchase, you’ll have access to 5 online practice tests, on top of a free version of the book made iPad compatible.

Top Websites:

Beat the GMAT

Review study plan suggestions, post your questions, locate online study groups, or delve into various GMAT courses on Beat the GMAT’s extensively adept website.

Crack GMAT

Crack GMAT provides multiple study tools and courses to help boost your scores. Learn proven testing techniques, how to avoid the most commonly made mistakes, and an assortment of other beneficial strategies covering each test section.

MBA.com

MBA.com offers a plethora of thorough GMAT courses, copious MBA school facts, and testing advice specifically meant to provide quality results. Download the free GMAT guide and software before you begin prepping for your exam.

Practice multiple mediums of study to determine your preferred method. We hope this list helps effectively increase your GMAT score, and in turn, gain acceptance to the MBA program of your choosing.

]]>

Individuals bent on advancing in their career field understand the effect GMAT scores have when applying for an MBA degree. With several GMAT preparatory methods available, locating leading resources may seem incomprehensible. For decades, students have invested their time in numerous publications meant specifically for GMAT prep. However, as the growth of technology enters numerous aspects of our daily lives, we’re noticing an undeniable GMAT prep shift from printed to electronic materials. A recent study shows 73% of college students own smartphones and roughly 30% own a tablet. Therefore, we at George Mason University would like to provide you with an all-inclusive list of recommended books and websites for GMAT prep.

Top Books:

Cracking the GMAT, 2011 Edition (Graduate School Test Preparation)

With an extensive collection of questions covering each GMAT section, two practice tests, and tips for maintaining an organized study plan, Cracking the GMAT is considered a top resource among MBA applicants.

Kaplan GMAT 800: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students (Kaplan Gmat Advanced)

If you’ve been looking for the most advanced GMAT prep book, the Kaplan GMAT 800: Advanced Prep for Advanced Students is meant for you. This book covers hundreds of the toughest practice questions, difficult concepts, and most revered testing strategies.

Kaplan New GMAT Premier 2013 with 5 Online Practice Tests (Kaplan Gmat Premier Live)

As an all-in-one guide composed specifically for students seeking test questions ranging from simple to complex, the Kaplan New GMAT Premier 2013 book has been deemed one of the leading study guides of 2013. Contents include prep questions covering multiple test sections, detailed answer explanations, and a thorough section dedicated entirely to Integrated Reasoning strategies/practice questions. Upon purchase, you’ll have access to 5 online practice tests, on top of a free version of the book made iPad compatible.

Top Websites:

Beat the GMAT

Review study plan suggestions, post your questions, locate online study groups, or delve into various GMAT courses on Beat the GMAT’s extensively adept website.

Crack GMAT

Crack GMAT provides multiple study tools and courses to help boost your scores. Learn proven testing techniques, how to avoid the most commonly made mistakes, and an assortment of other beneficial strategies covering each test section.

MBA.com

MBA.com offers a plethora of thorough GMAT courses, copious MBA school facts, and testing advice specifically meant to provide quality results. Download the free GMAT guide and software before you begin prepping for your exam.

Practice multiple mediums of study to determine your preferred method. We hope this list helps effectively increase your GMAT score, and in turn, gain acceptance to the MBA program of your choosing.

Original article: 

GMAT Prep: Top Study Materials

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Get the most from your MBA: Practice leadership http://asiancorrespondent.com/105816/get-the-most-from-your-mba-practice-leadership/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/105816/get-the-most-from-your-mba-practice-leadership/#comments Fri, 19 Apr 2013 06:52:30 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/105816/get-the-most-from-your-mba-practice-leadership/ Get the most from your MBA: Practice leadership

Many employers tell us that what they are looking for from MBA program graduates is simply put, leadership.  That is, upon graduation will the MBA graduate be able to effectively plan, influence others to get on board with the plan and then effectively adapt to inevitable change?  The Mason MBA program not only offers courses to enhance problem solving and analytical skills in areas such as accounting and finance, but it also offers opportunities for students to handle practical leadership challenges they will inevitably face, and what employers tell us are the hardest for to train.

Mason’s MBA program offers a set of popular electives that promote leadership skills for our students.  For example, MBA 725 Leadership, examines the critical roles and functions of leadership with a special focus on how leaders influence organizational performance and manage change.  MBA 726 Negotiations is an exercise-based class where theory and practice meet on a weekly basis to improve students’ approaches to negotiation and influence.  When in a leadership position, hiring, firing, managing, and motivating others becomes critical to sustaining a high-performance organization. MBA 713 Managing Human Capital focuses on these topics so students gain confidence implementing strategies to attract, retain, and motivate human capital.

Taking courses on leadership-related topics is not the only way to enhance leadership skills during the MBA program at Mason.  The Mason MBA provides opportunities for students to take on leadership roles.  The MBA Student Association organizes events to enhance the MBA community and to build networking opportunities for students. At Mason we pride ourselves on the cohort structure and rely on student cohort representatives to relay feedback to the program office in the spirit of continuous improvement.  Many MBA students enhance their professional development by seeking assistantships.  Research and teaching assistantships offer close interaction with faculty and opportunities to lead projects and/or class discussions with undergraduate students.

, , , ]]>

Get the most from your MBA: Practice leadership

Many employers tell us that what they are looking for from MBA program graduates is simply put, leadership.  That is, upon graduation will the MBA graduate be able to effectively plan, influence others to get on board with the plan and then effectively adapt to inevitable change?  The Mason MBA program not only offers courses to enhance problem solving and analytical skills in areas such as accounting and finance, but it also offers opportunities for students to handle practical leadership challenges they will inevitably face, and what employers tell us are the hardest for to train.

Mason’s MBA program offers a set of popular electives that promote leadership skills for our students.  For example, MBA 725 Leadership, examines the critical roles and functions of leadership with a special focus on how leaders influence organizational performance and manage change.  MBA 726 Negotiations is an exercise-based class where theory and practice meet on a weekly basis to improve students’ approaches to negotiation and influence.  When in a leadership position, hiring, firing, managing, and motivating others becomes critical to sustaining a high-performance organization. MBA 713 Managing Human Capital focuses on these topics so students gain confidence implementing strategies to attract, retain, and motivate human capital.

Taking courses on leadership-related topics is not the only way to enhance leadership skills during the MBA program at Mason.  The Mason MBA provides opportunities for students to take on leadership roles.  The MBA Student Association organizes events to enhance the MBA community and to build networking opportunities for students. At Mason we pride ourselves on the cohort structure and rely on student cohort representatives to relay feedback to the program office in the spirit of continuous improvement.  Many MBA students enhance their professional development by seeking assistantships.  Research and teaching assistantships offer close interaction with faculty and opportunities to lead projects and/or class discussions with undergraduate students.

, , ,

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Get the most from your MBA: Practice leadership

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What It Takes to Get an MBA http://asiancorrespondent.com/105125/what-it-takes-to-get-an-mba/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/105125/what-it-takes-to-get-an-mba/#comments Fri, 12 Apr 2013 02:00:54 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/105125/what-it-takes-to-get-an-mba/ What It Takes to Get an MBA

Have a look at the infographic below for a plethora of information pertaining to applying for or entering into an MBA program.

Source: dr4ward.com viaDR4WARD on Pinterest

Pursuing a career within the business world during uncertain economic times is risky without the proper qualifications and previous industry experience. Due to these circumstances, mastering the appropriate skill-set for your select career choice is more vital than ever. It’s no surprise that MBA program attendance has reached an all-time high and is expected to continue its upward turn in the foreseeable future.

A 2010 study on national MBA statistics indicates over 150,000 MBA degrees are granted annually from roughly 454 accredited MBA institutions. With varying programs available, nearly 57% of students opted for a part-time class schedule rather than attending a full-time course.

If you are considering entering an MBA program, locating a business school containing the classes you require to advance within your career field is step one. For example, simply typing Virginia Business Schools or Virginia MBA programs into Google’s search engine is a prime example of how to easily locate a school near you.

Familiarize yourself with the programs offered by your school of choice to determine which educational route you intend to pursue.Most business schools offer Traditional, Professional, and Executive MBA programs. Examine courses and schedules carefully prior to submitting your application or scheduling your GMAT.

Possessing an understanding of the enrollment process prior to submitting your application benefits you in the long-run. When applying, bear in mind what GMAT scores your school of choice requires, along with specified documents requested as part of the application process.

As the job market grows, we anticipate an even larger MBA program turn-out in the coming years. If you are interested in expanding your career opportunities with an MBA degree, visit our Admissions page for further details.

, , , , , , , , , ]]>

What It Takes to Get an MBA

Have a look at the infographic below for a plethora of information pertaining to applying for or entering into an MBA program.

Source: dr4ward.com viaDR4WARD on Pinterest

Pursuing a career within the business world during uncertain economic times is risky without the proper qualifications and previous industry experience. Due to these circumstances, mastering the appropriate skill-set for your select career choice is more vital than ever. It’s no surprise that MBA program attendance has reached an all-time high and is expected to continue its upward turn in the foreseeable future.

A 2010 study on national MBA statistics indicates over 150,000 MBA degrees are granted annually from roughly 454 accredited MBA institutions. With varying programs available, nearly 57% of students opted for a part-time class schedule rather than attending a full-time course.

If you are considering entering an MBA program, locating a business school containing the classes you require to advance within your career field is step one. For example, simply typing Virginia Business Schools or Virginia MBA programs into Google’s search engine is a prime example of how to easily locate a school near you.

Familiarize yourself with the programs offered by your school of choice to determine which educational route you intend to pursue.Most business schools offer Traditional, Professional, and Executive MBA programs. Examine courses and schedules carefully prior to submitting your application or scheduling your GMAT.

Possessing an understanding of the enrollment process prior to submitting your application benefits you in the long-run. When applying, bear in mind what GMAT scores your school of choice requires, along with specified documents requested as part of the application process.

As the job market grows, we anticipate an even larger MBA program turn-out in the coming years. If you are interested in expanding your career opportunities with an MBA degree, visit our Admissions page for further details.

, , , , , , , , ,

Continue at source:

What It Takes to Get an MBA

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Business School in Virginia http://asiancorrespondent.com/104950/business-school-in-virginia/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/104950/business-school-in-virginia/#comments Thu, 11 Apr 2013 08:30:03 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/104950/business-school-in-virginia/ Why you should choose a Business School in Virginia

By Keegan Cassady, MBA candidate May 2013

As a Virginian myself, there are many things I enjoy about higher education in Virginia.  I attended William and Mary for my undergraduate degree, and George Mason for my business degree.  I liked William and Mary for its distance – just far enough away to be independent, just close enough to do laundry runs – and I enjoy Mason for its proximity.  Half an hour by free shuttle to the Vienna metro, Mason is a cheap hour from Washington DC, and by car, half that.  It is accessible to the entire Northern Virginia area, which makes its proximity to contacts and connections incredibly immediate.

I would love to espouse Virginian values, way of life, culture, driving skills… but really, if you live here, you really cannot beat the discount afforded by our higher education facilities.  As a student paying my way through with student loans and odd jobs, I found this aspect of the program vital.  I also love the environment in which we learn business.  Virginia has a plethora of business opportunities available for any aspiring entrepreneur – from nearby tech giants, to government contracting in all its leviathan forms, to real estate to arts to dining.

Virginia is one of those wonderful states that offers the best of many worlds.  A stone’s throw from urban DC lie the burgeoning mid-rises of suburban Northern Virginia, containing such culturally popping locales as Falls Church and Arlington, with comfortable, quieter locales like Alexandria, Vienna, and McLean.  It’s a great location to be young, and a better place to be with family.  There are diversions of all manner, and opportunities of all stripes.

George Mason itself is located just outside of the great old city of Fairfax, the namesake city of one of the most affluent counties in the United States.  This college boasts that Innovation is Tradition, which of course means that the more things change, the more they stay the same.  The campus is constantly in a state of progression, building new monuments to education and becoming every inch a miniature city with every passing year.  Students young and old flock to this campus.

What really makes Virginia a great place for business is its people:  everyone here wants to work.  Some work for causes, some work for money, some labor for love and some labor to be with the ones they love.  But Virginians are not an idle people.  From Reston to Winchester, from Williamsburg to Mclean, Virginians live and work in a community bolstered by cheer and drive.  Ambition mingles with empathy on a daily basis and encourages the kind of helpful, hearty business that makes up the American legend.

For the place, for the price, for the people, you should really choose a Business School in Virginia, and for that matter, choose George Mason.

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Why you should choose a Business School in Virginia

By Keegan Cassady, MBA candidate May 2013

As a Virginian myself, there are many things I enjoy about higher education in Virginia.  I attended William and Mary for my undergraduate degree, and George Mason for my business degree.  I liked William and Mary for its distance – just far enough away to be independent, just close enough to do laundry runs – and I enjoy Mason for its proximity.  Half an hour by free shuttle to the Vienna metro, Mason is a cheap hour from Washington DC, and by car, half that.  It is accessible to the entire Northern Virginia area, which makes its proximity to contacts and connections incredibly immediate.

I would love to espouse Virginian values, way of life, culture, driving skills… but really, if you live here, you really cannot beat the discount afforded by our higher education facilities.  As a student paying my way through with student loans and odd jobs, I found this aspect of the program vital.  I also love the environment in which we learn business.  Virginia has a plethora of business opportunities available for any aspiring entrepreneur – from nearby tech giants, to government contracting in all its leviathan forms, to real estate to arts to dining.

Virginia is one of those wonderful states that offers the best of many worlds.  A stone’s throw from urban DC lie the burgeoning mid-rises of suburban Northern Virginia, containing such culturally popping locales as Falls Church and Arlington, with comfortable, quieter locales like Alexandria, Vienna, and McLean.  It’s a great location to be young, and a better place to be with family.  There are diversions of all manner, and opportunities of all stripes.

George Mason itself is located just outside of the great old city of Fairfax, the namesake city of one of the most affluent counties in the United States.  This college boasts that Innovation is Tradition, which of course means that the more things change, the more they stay the same.  The campus is constantly in a state of progression, building new monuments to education and becoming every inch a miniature city with every passing year.  Students young and old flock to this campus.

What really makes Virginia a great place for business is its people:  everyone here wants to work.  Some work for causes, some work for money, some labor for love and some labor to be with the ones they love.  But Virginians are not an idle people.  From Reston to Winchester, from Williamsburg to Mclean, Virginians live and work in a community bolstered by cheer and drive.  Ambition mingles with empathy on a daily basis and encourages the kind of helpful, hearty business that makes up the American legend.

For the place, for the price, for the people, you should really choose a Business School in Virginia, and for that matter, choose George Mason.

Source:  

Business School in Virginia

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Confidence and the MBA Program http://asiancorrespondent.com/107037/confidence-and-the-mba-program/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/107037/confidence-and-the-mba-program/#comments Wed, 10 Apr 2013 08:40:44 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/107037/confidence-and-the-mba-program/ Confidence and the MBA Program

Posted on behalf of Seth Whetzel

One thing that I’ve been reflecting upon since my return from the Mason Global Residency in Brazil is my newfound appreciation for the term “confidence”. This word is oft-used in just about any good MBA program, or at least in any good finance MBA program. Consumer confidence, investor confidence, confidence in the markets; the list of expressions with the term “confidence” goes on and on. As an undergraduate economics major, it always struck me how important such a fickle, intangible concept was to our overall economic growth. Yet the immense power that confidence wields on economic growth was never so apparent to me than in Brazil. It is just in the past decade or so that Brazil has emerged as a true world economic power, and it is no surprise that this emergence coincides with the first time in Brazil’s long history where its citizens actually have reason to be confident, even optimistic, about their future. After a century of political upheaval and instability, rampant inflation, sky-high interest rates, and rollercoaster exchanges rates, we learned two very interesting facts about Brazil. The first is that the rich generally keep about half their wealth outside of Brazil to protect themselves from what used to be the common occurrence of the value of their money vanishing overnight due to one of the aforementioned causes. The second is that those who are not wealthy (the majority of Brazilians) do a great job of avoiding paying any taxes by doing the majority of their business under the table. Both of these phenomenons are directly related to a lack of confidence in the political and legal institutions in Brazil and both have had a huge drag on the economy over the years. Imagine if Brazil’s wealthy kept 100% of their wealth in-country and suddenly doubled their domestic investment. Imagine if most Brazilians started paying taxes and the Brazilian government suddenly doubled their tax revenues. Imagine the combined impact on internal infrastructure and education – two of the domestic obstacles that have prevented Brazil from growing even faster and might represent a ceiling for Brazil’s economic climb.

For the longest time, Brazilians had no reason to be confident. Political stability was only a fantasy. But in the 21st century things appear to be different, and the dramatic lack of confidence that Brazilians have had in their own country is now starting to change. While remaining cautious, Brazilians have reason to believe, especially after surviving the recent global financial collapse relatively unscathed, that they have turned the page. There have witnessed their government manage successive democratic presidential elections while keeping inflation and interest rates in check for over a decade. And with that newfound confidence, we see huge growth and huge potential for the first time in modern Brazil’s history. Compare that to the situations in the U.S., where political gridlock has shaken Americans’ confidence in their politicians’ ability to do what is right for the country; and in Europe, where the common currency is on the brink of collapse and there is a very real possibility of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union. In these classic Western economic powerhouses, economic growth is stagnant and even declining. A little bit of confidence goes a long way, and for once, Brazil is winning the confidence battle.

About ewaxbom2

Assistant Director, MBA Programs in the School of Management at George Mason University

View all posts by ewaxbom2 ]]>

Confidence and the MBA Program

Posted on behalf of Seth Whetzel

One thing that I’ve been reflecting upon since my return from the Mason Global Residency in Brazil is my newfound appreciation for the term “confidence”. This word is oft-used in just about any good MBA program, or at least in any good finance MBA program. Consumer confidence, investor confidence, confidence in the markets; the list of expressions with the term “confidence” goes on and on. As an undergraduate economics major, it always struck me how important such a fickle, intangible concept was to our overall economic growth. Yet the immense power that confidence wields on economic growth was never so apparent to me than in Brazil. It is just in the past decade or so that Brazil has emerged as a true world economic power, and it is no surprise that this emergence coincides with the first time in Brazil’s long history where its citizens actually have reason to be confident, even optimistic, about their future. After a century of political upheaval and instability, rampant inflation, sky-high interest rates, and rollercoaster exchanges rates, we learned two very interesting facts about Brazil. The first is that the rich generally keep about half their wealth outside of Brazil to protect themselves from what used to be the common occurrence of the value of their money vanishing overnight due to one of the aforementioned causes. The second is that those who are not wealthy (the majority of Brazilians) do a great job of avoiding paying any taxes by doing the majority of their business under the table. Both of these phenomenons are directly related to a lack of confidence in the political and legal institutions in Brazil and both have had a huge drag on the economy over the years. Imagine if Brazil’s wealthy kept 100% of their wealth in-country and suddenly doubled their domestic investment. Imagine if most Brazilians started paying taxes and the Brazilian government suddenly doubled their tax revenues. Imagine the combined impact on internal infrastructure and education – two of the domestic obstacles that have prevented Brazil from growing even faster and might represent a ceiling for Brazil’s economic climb.

For the longest time, Brazilians had no reason to be confident. Political stability was only a fantasy. But in the 21st century things appear to be different, and the dramatic lack of confidence that Brazilians have had in their own country is now starting to change. While remaining cautious, Brazilians have reason to believe, especially after surviving the recent global financial collapse relatively unscathed, that they have turned the page. There have witnessed their government manage successive democratic presidential elections while keeping inflation and interest rates in check for over a decade. And with that newfound confidence, we see huge growth and huge potential for the first time in modern Brazil’s history. Compare that to the situations in the U.S., where political gridlock has shaken Americans’ confidence in their politicians’ ability to do what is right for the country; and in Europe, where the common currency is on the brink of collapse and there is a very real possibility of the United Kingdom leaving the European Union. In these classic Western economic powerhouses, economic growth is stagnant and even declining. A little bit of confidence goes a long way, and for once, Brazil is winning the confidence battle.

About ewaxbom2

Assistant Director, MBA Programs in the School of Management at George Mason University


View all posts by ewaxbom2

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Confidence and the MBA Program

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How to Choose the right Global MBA Program http://asiancorrespondent.com/104771/how-to-choose-the-right-global-mba-program/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/104771/how-to-choose-the-right-global-mba-program/#comments Tue, 09 Apr 2013 08:30:37 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/104771/how-to-choose-the-right-global-mba-program/ How to Choose the right Global MBA Program

By Keegan Cassady, MBA candidate May 2013

Does your Global MBA program take you to Brazil?  Does it house you in five star hotels, right off the beaches of Rio de Janeiro?  Does it dine you on the finest cuisine that Brazil has to offer?  George Mason’s global MBA program does, starting this year.  Innovation, as they say, is Tradition.

Every year, each Mason MBA cohort takes an excursion to some marvelous port of call.  The focus is chiefly becoming the BRIC’s: Brazil, Russia, India, and China, those fastest booming of economies – but tours also take place in Germany, Poland, and other grand locales.

As to my own personal experience, I was given a marathon week in Brazil.  From the sprawling urban streets of Sao Paulo to the clustered, balmy beaches of Rio de Janeiro, our tour gave us a plethora of perspectives on business and life in Brazil.  It was a fantastic experience, especially for an aspiring photographer and businessman.

We were guided by the ever-excellent Austral Group through a beautiful and thoroughly foreign world.  We met businesses new and old, great and small, toured factories and held interviews with high powered executives.  We intermingled amongst five different cohorts, dined on the sweet and savory fare of Sao Paulo and Rio, took in the lush natural environs, dashed out of sudden rainstorms and into comfortable bus tours of both legendary cities.  Through thick and thin, Austral kept our cohorts on course, and helped us experience a whole new world.

The most vital aspect of this foreign tour was to see a whole different way of doing business.  Brazil is a beautiful place, and incredibly strange to many American practices.  This makes such a trip that much more vital, and I feel, that much stronger an emphasis on why students seeking a global MBA should choose George Mason’s program.  The trip was life changing, and, after all, isn’t that everyone is seeking from their MBA?

]]>

How to Choose the right Global MBA Program

By Keegan Cassady, MBA candidate May 2013

Does your Global MBA program take you to Brazil?  Does it house you in five star hotels, right off the beaches of Rio de Janeiro?  Does it dine you on the finest cuisine that Brazil has to offer?  George Mason’s global MBA program does, starting this year.  Innovation, as they say, is Tradition.

Every year, each Mason MBA cohort takes an excursion to some marvelous port of call.  The focus is chiefly becoming the BRIC’s: Brazil, Russia, India, and China, those fastest booming of economies – but tours also take place in Germany, Poland, and other grand locales.

As to my own personal experience, I was given a marathon week in Brazil.  From the sprawling urban streets of Sao Paulo to the clustered, balmy beaches of Rio de Janeiro, our tour gave us a plethora of perspectives on business and life in Brazil.  It was a fantastic experience, especially for an aspiring photographer and businessman.

We were guided by the ever-excellent Austral Group through a beautiful and thoroughly foreign world.  We met businesses new and old, great and small, toured factories and held interviews with high powered executives.  We intermingled amongst five different cohorts, dined on the sweet and savory fare of Sao Paulo and Rio, took in the lush natural environs, dashed out of sudden rainstorms and into comfortable bus tours of both legendary cities.  Through thick and thin, Austral kept our cohorts on course, and helped us experience a whole new world.

The most vital aspect of this foreign tour was to see a whole different way of doing business.  Brazil is a beautiful place, and incredibly strange to many American practices.  This makes such a trip that much more vital, and I feel, that much stronger an emphasis on why students seeking a global MBA should choose George Mason’s program.  The trip was life changing, and, after all, isn’t that everyone is seeking from their MBA?

Visit site: 

How to Choose the right Global MBA Program

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Global Residency http://asiancorrespondent.com/104583/global-residency-2/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/104583/global-residency-2/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 08:00:46 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/104583/global-residency-2/ Posted on behalf of Aaron Winter

One of the common themes in the business presentations we attended during our global residency trip was the tremendous growth potential of the Brazilian domestic market. One driver of this growth is the increased spending power of the nation’s so-called “class C” citizens. (Brazilians are more literal than Americans about their nation’s wealth distribution; this is not merely an economist’s term but is used routinely in casual conversation. Class C Brazilians earn $12,000 to $15,000 per year and account for 51% of the nation’s population.) Another driver of growth is geographical, as the consumer economy expands outward from the wealthy southeast region that contains Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, further north toward the Atlantic tip and further west toward Amazonia.

When we visited Natura, a Brazilian cosmetics company, we were shown a lush corporate propaganda video that explained how the company was making it a priority to transform economically underdeveloped areas (that had formerly practiced slash-and-burn subsistence farming) into key cogs in a sustainable supply chain that made fantastic soaps, perfumes, and lotions from all-natural ingredients like passion fruit and cocoa butter. This concept of an Amazon-to-the-coast supply chain was all the more interesting because Natura, which has an Avon-like business model, sells its products not only in urban centers, but across all of Brazil’s 26 provinces.

“There was a time,” read the video’s English subtitles, “when Brazil didn’t know Brazil yet.” The country is still nationalizing, culturally, economically, and politically, in a way that can be somewhat hard for Americans to understand. In our country, much of this process happened before our grandparents were born. And – apologies for a brief flashback to my Ph.D. dissertation here – it can be hard to put your finger on the difference between what counts as a true cause in this chain of nationalizing events, and what counts as a mere epiphenomen. Sometimes the soap comes first, and it’s everything else that follows.

So Brazil is still in the process of getting to know Brazil, even today. When we visited Arezzo, a shoe company, our presenters were suave bilingual cosmopolitans who attended the same American MBA program as Dr. O’Neill (our trip chaperone). They were speaking to us in our own language, in more ways than one. But we were thrown off by one term they used repeatedly in their presentation. It took no fewer than three questions from our group to figure out what they really meant.

“Is any of your production outsourced?” we asked. “All of it,” they replied. But they had Brazilian designers, Brazilian cows, Brazilian leather workers, and Brazilian distributors? We finally figured out that they were using the word “outsourced” to mean produced outside of São Paulo, in the neighboring state of Minas Gerais. It was the equivalent of a Virginia-based company saying that it had outsourced manufacturing to North Carolina.

In other words, this was not a glitch in linguistic translation, but rather a gap in economic translation. Both consumption and production in that retail sector had been historically concentrated, such that this really was an instance of outsourcing, with all the value-creating opportunities and logistical hassles we associate with the term. It’s this kind of “aha” moment that makes the global residency trip worthwhile.

]]>

Posted on behalf of Aaron Winter

One of the common themes in the business presentations we attended during our global residency trip was the tremendous growth potential of the Brazilian domestic market. One driver of this growth is the increased spending power of the nation’s so-called “class C” citizens. (Brazilians are more literal than Americans about their nation’s wealth distribution; this is not merely an economist’s term but is used routinely in casual conversation. Class C Brazilians earn $12,000 to $15,000 per year and account for 51% of the nation’s population.) Another driver of growth is geographical, as the consumer economy expands outward from the wealthy southeast region that contains Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, further north toward the Atlantic tip and further west toward Amazonia.

When we visited Natura, a Brazilian cosmetics company, we were shown a lush corporate propaganda video that explained how the company was making it a priority to transform economically underdeveloped areas (that had formerly practiced slash-and-burn subsistence farming) into key cogs in a sustainable supply chain that made fantastic soaps, perfumes, and lotions from all-natural ingredients like passion fruit and cocoa butter. This concept of an Amazon-to-the-coast supply chain was all the more interesting because Natura, which has an Avon-like business model, sells its products not only in urban centers, but across all of Brazil’s 26 provinces.

“There was a time,” read the video’s English subtitles, “when Brazil didn’t know Brazil yet.” The country is still nationalizing, culturally, economically, and politically, in a way that can be somewhat hard for Americans to understand. In our country, much of this process happened before our grandparents were born. And – apologies for a brief flashback to my Ph.D. dissertation here – it can be hard to put your finger on the difference between what counts as a true cause in this chain of nationalizing events, and what counts as a mere epiphenomen. Sometimes the soap comes first, and it’s everything else that follows.

So Brazil is still in the process of getting to know Brazil, even today. When we visited Arezzo, a shoe company, our presenters were suave bilingual cosmopolitans who attended the same American MBA program as Dr. O’Neill (our trip chaperone). They were speaking to us in our own language, in more ways than one. But we were thrown off by one term they used repeatedly in their presentation. It took no fewer than three questions from our group to figure out what they really meant.

“Is any of your production outsourced?” we asked. “All of it,” they replied. But they had Brazilian designers, Brazilian cows, Brazilian leather workers, and Brazilian distributors? We finally figured out that they were using the word “outsourced” to mean produced outside of São Paulo, in the neighboring state of Minas Gerais. It was the equivalent of a Virginia-based company saying that it had outsourced manufacturing to North Carolina.

In other words, this was not a glitch in linguistic translation, but rather a gap in economic translation. Both consumption and production in that retail sector had been historically concentrated, such that this really was an instance of outsourcing, with all the value-creating opportunities and logistical hassles we associate with the term. It’s this kind of “aha” moment that makes the global residency trip worthwhile.

Read this article – 

Global Residency

]]>
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Global Residency http://asiancorrespondent.com/104424/global-residency/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/104424/global-residency/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 08:00:46 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/104424/global-residency/ Posted on behalf of Aaron Winter

One of the common themes in the business presentations we attended during our global residency trip was the tremendous growth potential of the Brazilian domestic market. One driver of this growth is the increased spending power of the nation’s so-called “class C” citizens. (Brazilians are more literal than Americans about their nation’s wealth distribution; this is not merely an economist’s term but is used routinely in casual conversation. Class C Brazilians earn $12,000 to $15,000 per year and account for 51% of the nation’s population.) Another driver of growth is geographical, as the consumer economy expands outward from the wealthy southeast region that contains Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, further north toward the Atlantic tip and further west toward Amazonia.

When we visited Natura, a Brazilian cosmetics company, we were shown a lush corporate propaganda video that explained how the company was making it a priority to transform economically underdeveloped areas (that had formerly practiced slash-and-burn subsistence farming) into key cogs in a sustainable supply chain that made fantastic soaps, perfumes, and lotions from all-natural ingredients like passion fruit and cocoa butter. This concept of an Amazon-to-the-coast supply chain was all the more interesting because Natura, which has an Avon-like business model, sells its products not only in urban centers, but across all of Brazil’s 26 provinces.

“There was a time,” read the video’s English subtitles, “when Brazil didn’t know Brazil yet.” The country is still nationalizing, culturally, economically, and politically, in a way that can be somewhat hard for Americans to understand. In our country, much of this process happened before our grandparents were born. And – apologies for a brief flashback to my Ph.D. dissertation here – it can be hard to put your finger on the difference between what counts as a true cause in this chain of nationalizing events, and what counts as a mere epiphenomen. Sometimes the soap comes first, and it’s everything else that follows.

So Brazil is still in the process of getting to know Brazil, even today. When we visited Arezzo, a shoe company, our presenters were suave bilingual cosmopolitans who attended the same American MBA program as Dr. O’Neill (our trip chaperone). They were speaking to us in our own language, in more ways than one. But we were thrown off by one term they used repeatedly in their presentation. It took no fewer than three questions from our group to figure out what they really meant.

“Is any of your production outsourced?” we asked. “All of it,” they replied. But they had Brazilian designers, Brazilian cows, Brazilian leather workers, and Brazilian distributors? We finally figured out that they were using the word “outsourced” to mean produced outside of São Paulo, in the neighboring state of Minas Gerais. It was the equivalent of a Virginia-based company saying that it had outsourced manufacturing to North Carolina.

In other words, this was not a glitch in linguistic translation, but rather a gap in economic translation. Both consumption and production in that retail sector had been historically concentrated, such that this really was an instance of outsourcing, with all the value-creating opportunities and logistical hassles we associate with the term. It’s this kind of “aha” moment that makes the global residency trip worthwhile.

]]>

Posted on behalf of Aaron Winter

One of the common themes in the business presentations we attended during our global residency trip was the tremendous growth potential of the Brazilian domestic market. One driver of this growth is the increased spending power of the nation’s so-called “class C” citizens. (Brazilians are more literal than Americans about their nation’s wealth distribution; this is not merely an economist’s term but is used routinely in casual conversation. Class C Brazilians earn $12,000 to $15,000 per year and account for 51% of the nation’s population.) Another driver of growth is geographical, as the consumer economy expands outward from the wealthy southeast region that contains Rio de Janeiro and São Paulo, further north toward the Atlantic tip and further west toward Amazonia.

When we visited Natura, a Brazilian cosmetics company, we were shown a lush corporate propaganda video that explained how the company was making it a priority to transform economically underdeveloped areas (that had formerly practiced slash-and-burn subsistence farming) into key cogs in a sustainable supply chain that made fantastic soaps, perfumes, and lotions from all-natural ingredients like passion fruit and cocoa butter. This concept of an Amazon-to-the-coast supply chain was all the more interesting because Natura, which has an Avon-like business model, sells its products not only in urban centers, but across all of Brazil’s 26 provinces.

“There was a time,” read the video’s English subtitles, “when Brazil didn’t know Brazil yet.” The country is still nationalizing, culturally, economically, and politically, in a way that can be somewhat hard for Americans to understand. In our country, much of this process happened before our grandparents were born. And – apologies for a brief flashback to my Ph.D. dissertation here – it can be hard to put your finger on the difference between what counts as a true cause in this chain of nationalizing events, and what counts as a mere epiphenomen. Sometimes the soap comes first, and it’s everything else that follows.

So Brazil is still in the process of getting to know Brazil, even today. When we visited Arezzo, a shoe company, our presenters were suave bilingual cosmopolitans who attended the same American MBA program as Dr. O’Neill (our trip chaperone). They were speaking to us in our own language, in more ways than one. But we were thrown off by one term they used repeatedly in their presentation. It took no fewer than three questions from our group to figure out what they really meant.

“Is any of your production outsourced?” we asked. “All of it,” they replied. But they had Brazilian designers, Brazilian cows, Brazilian leather workers, and Brazilian distributors? We finally figured out that they were using the word “outsourced” to mean produced outside of São Paulo, in the neighboring state of Minas Gerais. It was the equivalent of a Virginia-based company saying that it had outsourced manufacturing to North Carolina.

In other words, this was not a glitch in linguistic translation, but rather a gap in economic translation. Both consumption and production in that retail sector had been historically concentrated, such that this really was an instance of outsourcing, with all the value-creating opportunities and logistical hassles we associate with the term. It’s this kind of “aha” moment that makes the global residency trip worthwhile.

See the article here – 

Global Residency

]]>
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3 Study Tips to Help You Dominate the GMAT http://asiancorrespondent.com/107219/3-study-tips-to-help-you-dominate-the-gmat/ http://asiancorrespondent.com/107219/3-study-tips-to-help-you-dominate-the-gmat/#comments Fri, 05 Apr 2013 04:00:42 +0000 http://asiancorrespondent.com/107219/3-study-tips-to-help-you-dominate-the-gmat/ 3 Study Tips to Help You Dominate the GMAT

“Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful.” ― John Maeda

Formulating a simple, cohesive GMAT study plan for yourself is a matter of trial and error. Plenty of previous test takers have learned this the long and drawn out way. Prior to hitting the books, take a look at these tips specifically meant for creating a personalized GMAT study plan that have proven successful for hundreds of previous test takers.

Utilize the Web. The internet isn’t just for downloading prep materials anymore. This is about absorbing forum upon forum of successful (and unsuccessful) test takers. Or reading blogs with vital test taking tips and strategies. Even joining GMAT discussions or forming an online study group. You can do this all before cracking open a GMAT prep book. The more advice you locate, the simpler mapping out your own personalized strategy will be.

Identify your strengths and weaknesses. This may seem like a given, however several potential test-takers tend to dive in without having a complete grasp on their needs. Begin by taking a practice test to identify where you stand. Where did you struggle? Congratulations! You’ve identified the ideal starting place.

Allow plenty of study time. Keep your current situation in mind prior to scheduling your test. Are you a parent or have a job with a strict schedule. Allow yourself a minimum of 2-3 months for studying prior to your GMAT. Contribute a designated amount of time per day to a chosen section of the test and continue from there. During your pre-determined study periods, attempt to master a portion of the practice test you found especially daunting then dedicate time to the rest of your material. With time, your weaknesses won’t seem near as daunting.

Remember, even the most well thought-out strategies will need tweaking at some point. When a full-proof technique you found on an excellent forum doesn’t work for you, don’t let it bring you down. Review your strategy, tighten the loose screw, and move on. Keep these tips in mind when studying for your GMAT. Best of luck!

, , , , ,

About Paige Wolf

As director of graduate programs at George Mason's School of Management, my vision is to have a vibrant, collegial community of active learners who develop enduring professional relationships with faculty, staff, and fellow students while pursuing their degrees. Prior to this position, I spent 11 years with the School of Management as an associate professor of management teaching both MBA and undergraduate courses in organizational behavior and human resource management. I have more than 16 years of experience as an internal and external consultant on strategic human resource initiatives including team building, organizational development, competency modelling, performance management, employee selection systems, career planning, employee training and development, leadership assessment, and human resource audits.

View all posts by Paige Wolf ]]>

3 Study Tips to Help You Dominate the GMAT

“Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful.” ― John Maeda

Formulating a simple, cohesive GMAT study plan for yourself is a matter of trial and error. Plenty of previous test takers have learned this the long and drawn out way. Prior to hitting the books, take a look at these tips specifically meant for creating a personalized GMAT study plan that have proven successful for hundreds of previous test takers.

Utilize the Web. The internet isn’t just for downloading prep materials anymore. This is about absorbing forum upon forum of successful (and unsuccessful) test takers. Or reading blogs with vital test taking tips and strategies. Even joining GMAT discussions or forming an online study group. You can do this all before cracking open a GMAT prep book. The more advice you locate, the simpler mapping out your own personalized strategy will be.

Identify your strengths and weaknesses. This may seem like a given, however several potential test-takers tend to dive in without having a complete grasp on their needs. Begin by taking a practice test to identify where you stand. Where did you struggle? Congratulations! You’ve identified the ideal starting place.

Allow plenty of study time. Keep your current situation in mind prior to scheduling your test. Are you a parent or have a job with a strict schedule. Allow yourself a minimum of 2-3 months for studying prior to your GMAT. Contribute a designated amount of time per day to a chosen section of the test and continue from there. During your pre-determined study periods, attempt to master a portion of the practice test you found especially daunting then dedicate time to the rest of your material. With time, your weaknesses won’t seem near as daunting.

Remember, even the most well thought-out strategies will need tweaking at some point. When a full-proof technique you found on an excellent forum doesn’t work for you, don’t let it bring you down. Review your strategy, tighten the loose screw, and move on. Keep these tips in mind when studying for your GMAT. Best of luck!

, , , , ,

About Paige Wolf

As director of graduate programs at George Mason’s School of Management, my vision is to have a vibrant, collegial community of active learners who develop enduring professional relationships with faculty, staff, and fellow students while pursuing their degrees.

Prior to this position, I spent 11 years with the School of Management as an associate professor of management teaching both MBA and undergraduate courses in organizational behavior and human resource management.

I have more than 16 years of experience as an internal and external consultant on strategic human resource initiatives including team building, organizational development, competency modelling, performance management, employee selection systems, career planning, employee training and development, leadership assessment, and human resource audits.


View all posts by Paige Wolf

This article – 

3 Study Tips to Help You Dominate the GMAT

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