My name is Carmelo Amalfi.
I teach journalism at Murdoch University in Perth and work as a freelance journalist for a number of Western Australian and national publications including ScienceNetworkWA (www.sciencewa.net.au), Australian Broadcasting Corporation and The Australian and The Sunday Times newspapers. I also am regularly commissioned to write and/or edit for a number of State and Federal government agencies including WA Fisheries and the CSIRO, Australia’s premier science research organisation.


Until 2005, I worked for 18 years at The West Australian newspaper in Perth, specialising for most of that time in science and environment, history, higher education and defence.

My job has taken me around Australia and the world, the most recent destination the Copenhagen climate change conference in Denmark in December 2009.


I was fortunate enough to have been the only WA journalist/journalism teacher accredited to attend the international conference where I also supervised three journalism students, whose work was published by The Sunday Times’ leading WA online news site, PerthNow (www.perthnow.com.au).

I also created a blogspot (www.copenhagen09conf.blogspot.com) to provide independent news coverage to this important event, both for the public and the media, having posted in just over a week 33 stories totalling more than 12,000 words.


Having enjoyed a highly successful career in journalism in which I hold several local and national journalism awards, I feel it is very important to pass on my skills and experience to the next generation of ‘journo’ whose responsibility it is, now more than ever, to ‘educate and inform’ people about issues which affect how they live, work and think. Though I believe traditional forms of information such as newspapers and radio will continue to provide the public with its daily diet of news stories, it is the online medium that challenges journalists, young and old, to adapt to the changing media menu in which blogs, twitters and facebook are very popular.


At Murdoch, student journalists are exposed to all facets of the profession, from creating newspapers or news ‘sheets’ to producing online works incorporating elements of radio (audio), tv (video) and print into one independent ‘Newsroom’. In 2010, the journalism school at Murdoch will launch a new web site that will publish a variety of works by students and staff, including blogs, vlogs and features reflecting the rapidly growing world of online journalism.


My teaching responsibilities also include placing high-achieving third-year students into different newspaper and online workplaces where they can practise what they are taught at Murdoch. Some have already been employed and/or published by these organisations. Others have moved overseas to work for international media groups such as the BBC.

From second semester 2010, I will also coordinate a news investigative reporting unit at Murdoch and the Global Environmental Journalism Initiative between four Australian and European universities. Presently, we have four students placed in prestigious media schools in Finland and Greece, recent placements held in Denmark and Britain.


I encourage anyone interested in learning more about the Murdoch University journalism program to visit www.murdoch.edu.au or, as they say, Google me. 8-)