Samak’s main opportunity to speak to the country is his weekly show on Sunday.

AFP:

“We cannot let the situation in the country go on like this,” Samak said on his weekly television address to the nation.
“It must be over, but I will not do anything that will create a bad atmosphere. The announcement of an emergency decree would create a bad atmosphere in the country and to the world.”

The People’s Alliance for Democracy (PAD) objects to Samak’s plans to amend the constitution and his close ties with ousted premier Thaksin Shinawatra.

What they (the PAD) are trying to do now is overthrow the government,” Samak said Sunday. “They seized government offices, airports. Is this democracy, or is this is the people’s alliance to destroy democracy?”

Reuters:

Samak, who has said he would never bow to the demands of the People’s Alliance for Democracy (PAD), warned in his weekly radio address that his patience was wearing out.

“I am not afraid, but I am concerned about chaos in the nation,” he said. “We cannot let the seizure of Government House continue indefinitely without taking action.”

BBC:

In his weekly radio address, Mr Samak said: “Since the government cannot resolve the problem – even the courts cannot resolve the problem – the joint session of parliament is the best choice for finding a solution.”

He again insisted that he would not resign, saying he was not afraid but was concerned about “chaos in the nation”.

Mr Samak said he did not want to create a “bad atmosphere” by announcing emergency measures.

In his radio address, Mr Samak said the protesters had “destroyed Thailand’s image as the most attractive tourist destination” and that airport security would have to be reviewed.

Bloomberg:

“The people who caused airports to close are causing damage to the tourism industry,” Samak said. “They are smashing our rice bowl.”

BP: He doesn’t sound like he is backing down.