MUMBAI, India (AP) — Rabbis from across Asia are celebrating the reopening of a Jewish center targeted by rampaging Pakistani gunmen who stormed through Mumbai on a 60-hour killing spree in 2008.

The attacks on the Chabad center and other iconic locations in India’s financial capital left 166 people dead, including the orthodox Jewish center’s Rabbi Gavriel Holtzberg and his wife.

Rabbi Israel Kozlovsky, who now runs the center, said the rebuilt six-story Nariman House would house a $2.5 million Jewish Museum as well as Mumbai’s first memorial to those slain in the attacks. Rabbis based across Asia for the orthodox Jewish group Chabad-Lubavitch attended Tuesday’s reopening.

Holtzberg’s father, Rabbi Nachman Holtzberg, called on people to remember those slain and “celebrate their lives and the message of light that they spread.”