WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. has expressed regret that many Thais were prevented from voting at the weekend but says it isn’t taking sides in the nation’s political disputes.

Anti-government protesters prevented millions of people from voting in elections Sunday that were boycotted by the main opposition party. Special elections will be required to complete the balloting.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said Monday the U.S. remains concerned that political tensions in Thailand are posing challenges to its democratic institutions and processes.

She told reporters the U.S. doesn’t want to see a military coup or recourse to violence, and is urging all sides to commit to dialogue and “resolve political differences peacefully and democratically.”

The protesters contend the Thai government is corrupt and want an unelected council to take power and institute reforms.