The British LibraryRachel Arnold, a third year Music and History combined honours student, has been asked by the British Library to contribute some blog posts for their new exhibition Propaganda: Power and Persuasion.

Rachel’s research for an interdisciplinary dissertation, comparing the use of the radio in 1930s Britain and Nazi Germany, has revealed new data – that in both countries light music and dance music were favourites with audiences, that classical music was used to assert cultural superiority, and that radio broadcasts with popular performers boosted the morale of soldiers and the home front.

Curator John Kaye said, “these [findings] seem like fairly obscure and under-used primary resources which should find an interested readership on our blog posts”.The exhibition’s posts have started going up here. Rachel’s contributions will join the blog later in the year.

The Propaganda: Power and Persuasion exhibition is the first to explore international state propaganda from both 20th and 21st centuries, showing how different forms of media can be used by states to influence and persuade their citizens. The exhibition is now open and runs until 17 September, accompanied by a number of events and public presentations.

For more information visit the British Library Website.